Oh, give me a home, where the buffalo roam

Posted: August 19, 2013 in Animals, Nature, Photos, Travel
Tags: , , , , , ,

Not long after we were surrounded by the buffalo crossing the road (Why do buffalo cross the road? Who knows and who’s brave enough to try to stop an animal as large as a Smart Car?), we came up on a herd in the meadows on either side of the road. Try to imagine the days when herds of buffalo stretched for miles on the plains. What an awesome sight that must have been, in the true sense of the word!

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Even buffalo calves are good-sized.

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Another waterfall.

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Man vs. wild.

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I couldn’t decide which of these last two pictures of an impending storm I liked better, so I included them both.  Which do you prefer and why?  Fortunately, the storm never materialized and we had our time in Mammoth Hot Springs with only clouds.  Check back tomorrow for pictures of the amazing thermal activity there.

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Comments
  1. Bastet says:

    Great photos, you live in a beautiful zone!

  2. C.J. Black says:

    The pictures and the scenery are beyond words.

  3. Alastair says:

    All great photos Janet

  4. Dear Janet,

    Great pics as always. My personal favorite is the one with the squashed beer or pop can. It’s a great (for lack of a more apt word) illustration of our blatant disregard for creation.

    shalom,

    Rochelle

    • I thought the same thing, Rochelle. Here’s astounding beauty and someone drops that can, squashes it and leaves it there. “Blatant disregard” is exactly how I would have put it.

      janet

  5. Thanks for this great photos – I would like to see Buffalos for real once, we only have Bouffons here, but that’s a different species I think :o)

  6. My personal favorite is the fourth from the last. The half dead pine in the foreground and vistas going on forever. I love big spaces, and Wyoming certainly has them. Thank you for sharing your wonderful vacation.

  7. Tina Schell says:

    Love the buffalo shot! When we visited Yellowstone a large male chose the middle of the road for a stroll. He was larger than many if the cars as we took turns gingerly moving around him!

    • In relation to even our van, they are still quite large and if one just swung its head, it could knock you silly. The smaller cars looked very small as the buffalo moved past them. Too many people there just don’t understand the “wild” part of “wild animals.”

      janet

  8. Wonderful photos – it makes me imagine how exciting and frightening it must have been for a pioneer family that grew up in a fairly flat and (even back then) tamed part of the country to find themselves surrounded by dangerous not-exactly-cows and dwarfed by huge trees and staring ahead in horror at those enormous mountains they and their oxen were going to have to travel up and over, somehow or other!

    As for your “storm” pictures – personally, I like the first one, because it seems full of movement – the trees are leaning the same direction as the clouds, and the clouds are “taller” on the left side of the photo. You can almost feel the wind that’s going to carry them forward to menace the righthand side too!

  9. Truly incredible… I don’t think I’ve ever seen a buffalo in real life before. It really is a whole different world out there.I can only hope I have the chance to explore it myself one day. Your photos sure are pushing me to investigate sooner than later!

    • Hannah, it truly is a different world and one very worth exploring. If you get the chance, there’s a fabulous lodge near Old Faithful, although I don’t know how much in advance you have to reserve. But staying in Cody, Wyoming and driving into the park each day would be great, too. Cody has the Buffalo Bill Museum which is excellent and one of the most authentic Japanese restaurants we’ve ever found. Odd, but true. I hope you make it soon.

      janet

      • Crazy! I never would have associated Japanese restaurants, let alone authentic ones, with the “wild wild west.” Live and learn, right?

      • A Japanese couple came to Cody and liked it so much, they moved there and started a restaurant. We came upon it by chance a few years ago and our younger daughter, who’d been in Japan, declared it very authentic. As for very tasty, we all agreed. But it is definitely not what you’d expect.

  10. mpejovic says:

    Looks like a beautiful spot for a vacation.

    • Yellowstone is both beautiful and unique, well worth the time. We did a whirlwind one-day trip from where we were staying in the Bighorn Mountains, leaving at 5 am and returning about 1:30 am the next day. But it was worth it.

      janet

  11. Angeline M says:

    Beautiful photos! I loved seeing the buffalo in that second shot…I’ve never seen one up close and personal, but this entire series is wonderful!

    • I’m glad you’re enjoying the trip. There will be more but not until I get home on Wednesday. I’m almost ready to take you to Mammoth Hot Springs and some of the amazing formations there. As for the buffalo, I’ve never been that close either. Any closer and they literally would have been in the van…which would be a bit too close. 🙂

      janet

  12. de Wets Wild says:

    We’re enjoying coming along on your trip through Yellowstone so much Janet.

    I’d imagine that Bison would be included in an American “Big Five”, being so reminiscent of the African buffalo 😉

    • I’m glad you’re enjoying the trip! It’s so much fun to be able to share it. Tomorrow will be a humorous post for part of the trip, then well head over to Mammoth Hot Springs. Can’t wait to share it.

      janet

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