Trains used to play an important part of our nation’s transportation system and where there were trains, there were train depots.  One of these depots was the 1881 Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific depot from Symerton, Illinois on the line from Chicago to Decatur.  Although the depot hasn’t been used for years, the Will County Historical Society moved it board by board in 1979 to Lockport, Illinois, to be part of its Frontier Village.  We first saw it during a long bike ride we took for our anniversary last September.

© janet m. webb

As you can see, the station’s exterior has been beautifully restored and painted and because this is a Thursday Doors post, here’s a close up of the simple, attractive door.

© janet m. webb

But wait!  There’s more!  Even on the frontier, there were schools and every school had at least one door.

© janet m. webb

This looks like a door with lots of potential behind it!

© janet m. webb

Last, but definitely not least, there was one door for a structure sometimes called, appropriately enough, the necessary.  Let me make you privy to what that was.

© janet m. webb

If you’d like to be privy to more doors around the world, take the train to Montreal to visit Norm, our a-door-able host.  Or, if you don’t have time for that, you can just click here.  All aboard!!

 

Comments
  1. Emma Cownie says:

    I am so glad that these buildings have been preserved. They give such a poignant sense of the past.

  2. Leya says:

    We still have a privy at our summer house – not used anymore, though…Love doors up in the air, without steps to it!

  3. ksbeth says:

    how interesting

  4. Dan Antion says:

    Great doors, and some fun explanations. Janet. I love train stations, but the smokehouse door is my favorite today. Of course, I’m hungry for some burnt ends, but that’s another story.

    • We went to a Super Bowl party and the host had done brisket, pulled pork, burnt ends, and sugared? bacon. I ate way, way too much but those burnt ends were the first I’d had that were tender rather than burnt to a crisp.

  5. Now, this is a post with a wonderful selection of doors allowing one to travel, learn, eat, or use the necessary room. Love it. 🙂

  6. Allan G. Smorra says:

    A lovely tour, Janet. I’m with Dan concerning the smokehouse door. What delicious wonders have graced it’s insides?
    Ω

  7. Thanks for sharing! I’d never heard of this place before.

  8. Brilliant post, Janet. Lovely photos and very funny. 🙂

  9. scr4pl80 says:

    Wish we had lovely train stations like that around here. We live right across the street from the train stop in our city and there is just a couple of machines enclosed with 3-sided walls. No friendly station master to sell us our tickets 😦 In fact, we have a card now like a credit card that we hold up to a scanner. So impersonal.

    • This one isn’t in use anymore, but the station in downtown Naperville (our city) is an older, brick station and still quite nice despite machines. But there is a window with a real person on the other side during the day.

      janet

  10. belocchio says:

    Introspective doors, Janet. We know where some of the doors lead. But what is story behind the others. Doors are an enigma. We would like to know all!

  11. Norm 2.0 says:

    They are all lovely but I’m particularly fond of that train station. Excellent shots Janet 🙂

  12. Vicky says:

    Well, those are ver lovely shots and nice doors, but I tell you what I thought was really cool, your little copyright motif sneaking into the pictures in unusual places… cool editing…

  13. Amy says:

    It’s so great that they’ve preserved it and so nicely too. Thanks for sharing.

  14. I see that the depot used to be heated, there’s a chimney sticking out of the roof line. Lovely photos.

  15. Great doors! Too bad there really wasn’t a steak or tritip ready for eatin at the Smokehouse door. 🙂

    I’m glad they were able to preserve and save these buildings.

  16. joey says:

    Old school door, just charming as all get out! 🙂

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