Archive for the ‘Monday walk’ Category

Although I know Jo’s shivering just read this and will continue to do so as she virtually walks with me, this really was my dream walk. Many of you know we’re getting ready to move to Arizona in a few months, which prompts everyone to tell us how lucky we are. Truth be told, I grew up in the Midwest and, except for several years when I lived in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (think skiing plus an extra season, mud season, which comes after winter), I’ve lived with four seasons all my life. I confess: I love winter!

I’ve been actually praying for a good snow before we leave, but it’s been an almost snow-less winter so far. But when I woke up last week, we had about 5″ of snow, enough to feel and look like a good snow, but not so much that it was a problem.

After shoveling the driveway, I headed for the park, where my dream got even better…I was the first person to walk there since the snow had fallen!!! My cheeks and my smile were both frozen on my face.

Everything was covered with snow and breath-takingly beautiful!!

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The sun’s up earlier these days and I got going a bit later so the sun was hitting the tops of the trees along the river when I arrived at the snow-covered park. It wasn’t a lot of snow, but enough to look pretty and cover the bumpy ice still on parts of the path. It was nice not to crunch at every step!

Turn around. There’s the sun just over the horizon.

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I promised that we’d complete our walk through the Beyond Bauhaus weaving exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago, so let’s get going. (Here’s the link to the prior post if you missed it.) There are some very fine (as opposed to coarse) weavings as well as another one of the ones that remind me of a waterfall. You’re welcome to stop and look whenever you like. Except for the last one, these depend not so much on color as on texture and shadow.

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Today you’ll be happy to be doing a virtual walk, as this walk was cold and windy, windy being a trademark of Chicago, and as I’m writing this, it’s also cold and windy. But you don’t even have to bundle up, whereas this poor lion in front of the Art Institute of Chicago was wearing nothing but a wreath. (He’s even blue with cold!) The enormous line of people waiting were bundled up a lot more.

We’ve seen part of the weaving exhibit at the musuem, but today we’re going to venture around the environs of the museum, heading toward The Bean, more formally known as Cloud Gate, in Millennium Park. But first let’s take a look at Crown Fountain, where the faces change regularly in all seasons, but no water comes out in winter. Wonder why? 🙂

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It’s grey and cold outside, so let’s take a walk indoors, inside the Art Institute of Chicago to the Weaving Beyond the Bauhaus exhibit. (If you click on the link, you can see a wonderful creation that I couldn’t photograph well. Worth the click.) And you can read a bit more about the exhibit, the movement, and the weavers here.

But if you just want to walk, you’ll find some fascinating and unusual uses of weaving, starting with this first one. I can’t even imagine the amount of time and material this took, to say nothing of a very large studio area!

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At this time of year, it’s not difficult to get to the park before sunrise. It’s my favorite time, a time when animals are often still out and when the park is usually rather empty (unless it’s the weekend.) In the last week or so, there’ve been some rather good sunrises, the sun first a small red-orange fingernail on the horizon, gradually growing larger until it emerges as a giant red ball.

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After Christmas, our younger daughter and the two of us headed into “the city” to visit the WNDR Museum. In the best current tradition of abbreviating everything (or maybe they couldn’t buy any vowels), WNDR equates to “Wonder” and wonder-filled it is.

Designed to challenge your ideas about a museum and inviting you to interact (and take a million selfies), the museum is full of color, lights, and action. Yes, it’s completely geared to the “all about me/selfie-taking” generation but it’s lots of fun for us oldies, too.

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While in France, we took three or four walks a day with the dogs. On this day, we walked in the empty, harvested fields as sunset approached. The clouds and the light made an ever-changing pageant.

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Walk into the Penn Museum and you’re face to face with a sphinx, the largest in the western hemisphere.

In October 1913 a colossal granite sphinx arrived in Philadelphia to great excitement. Weighing close to 15 tons, the sphinx was the second largest ancient Egyptian monument ever to come to America (after New York’s Central Park obelisk that had arrived in 1881). The sphinx, over 3,000 years old, has inscriptions of the famous pharaoh Ramses II (Ramses the Great) who reigned ca. 1200 BCE.Penn Museum website

As you can see, the head is badly damaged while the body and cartouches are in excellent shape. At some point, the body, up to the shoulders, was buried in sand, preserving it. Eventually, the entire sphinx was buried before being discovered.

Let’s head over to the Egyptian gallery. There’s so much to see! On this head, the cobra and the royal headdress seem to indicate a Pharaoh. Looks like he’s meditating. 🙂

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I had a very busy weekend, so I’m not inclined to do much walking today, so let’s just take a quick walk to a lovely butcher shop in Luxeuil-les-bains, Boucherie Giromagny. It doesn’t take many steps to get around the shop, but you’ll need to stop and take it all in anyway. Let’s get started!

I wish I could have some sort of scratch-and-sniff button for this post, but you’ll just have to imagine how wonderful it smelled. The hams hanging on the back wall are indigenous to this area. The meat here isn’t factory farm meat, but from the area and, I imagine, mostly or all organic.

© janet m. webb

We’re in France, so should we get a bottle of wine? There are all other sorts of goodies as well. Step a bit closer and look.

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