Archive for the ‘Thursday doors’ Category

Door?  What door?  You can’t miss it, but you don’t really notice it.  Just goes to show Philadelphia is more than historic doors!

Norm, our fearless leader, can be spotted periodically (but every Thursday) on his blog. You can also cat-ch other entries to the Thursday Doors challenge by clicking on the linky critter in his Thursday blog entry. It’s paws-atively addictive!

© janet m. webb 2017

Is that Norm, shogun of Thursday Doors, on the right-hand door of this rather elegant piece of furniture from the Chicago Institute of Art?  Perhaps not, but he does host one of the most enjoyable weekly challenges in blogdom.  He is, however, a benevolent ruler, so if you have some door photos to share, please head over to his blog to link up with the rest of the troops.

© janet m. webb 2016

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An evening art walk in Old Town Scottsdale, Arizona imparts a different feel from a daytime visit.  A number of galleries are open under strands of Christmas lights still festooning the streets.  Laughter and light spill from open doors, the former fueled perhaps by free drink as well as food.  But beware!  As you can see from the cowboy below, life in the old West can be dangerous!

© janet m. webb 2017

There’s nothing like a blue door…unless it’s three blue doors…and three blue-framed windows as a bonus.  Although you can’t really see the other door lurking between #40 and #2, it’s down there.  Lots of door bang for my photo buck at this Philadelphia location.

Norm kindly hosts us each week and to see his entry or to access the other entries, please go to his blog.

Our  Thursday Doors time capsule (no photo of the door available) hurtles us back this week past millions of doors to the year 2010, before TD was a tiny, hobbit-sized door idea in Norm’s mind.

Since I was in college, I’ve been going to Wyoming at some point during the summer, missing only a few years in all that time.  For many years, my parents were there all summer, so when our girls were very young, we stayed in the cabin of a friend of the family, giving everyone more space and privacy.  The cabin was heated only by this wood-burning stove and despite it being summer, there were often days when we needed that heat.  (There were years when it snowed in June!)  My husband or I would get up quietly in the morning, get the fire going, then head back to bed until the main room warmed up, although sometimes I would get dressed and sit outside with a cup of tea, watching moose or just relaxing.  This was definitely a working stove!

When our older daughter was old enough to take care of the fire, she would often get it stoked up before we went out for a horseback ride, which felt great in the morning.  However, the cabin roof caught the sun about mid-morning, so sometimes we would come back to a cabin so hot we had to open the door and all the windows in an effort to make it bearable.  🙂

© janet m. webb 2010

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I’ve featured doors from Villersexel before on Thursday Doors, as well as the chateau that distinguishes this town of under 2,000 residents.  In 1871, the French and the Prussians battled here, during which time the mostly-timber chateau was destroyed by fire.  In the same year, the owner looked for an architect working with more fire-resistant materials, choosing the young Gustave Eiffel (yes, that Eiffel) who was working with iron.  Shall I say that Eiffel developed into a towering talent?  Perhaps not.

At any rate, the chateau is completely furnished in this period. Lafayette reportedly lived in the current Chateau, while Charles De Gaulle and Winston Churchill both stayed there.  However, most of the people live in less exalted homes, yet homes with interesting doors.  These three represent three different sorts of doors, something for everyone.

The colorfully elegant…

© janet m. webb 2016

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Beauty certainly is in the eye of the beholder.  While I was in France, one of my s-i-l’s dogs was very sick, vomiting throughout the day and night, leaving her with blankets and rugs that needed to be cleaned continuously.  But in France, electricity is expensive and washers and dryers aren’t enormous.  So when we discovered these washers and driers outside a store in a nearby town, we were elated.  They were a bargain and we could get grocery shopping done while we waited. (We were also fortunate in that we never had to wait, something that doesn’t always happen.)  Those were some of the most beautiful doors of the entire trip!

© janet m. webb 2016

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