Sue at WordsVisual recently shared a number of photos featuring light.  Here’s my Six-Word Saturday entry for this week in honor of all the lovely light she photographed.  This is were the early morning sunshine hits the contents of a small table on our second floor and it always commands my attention and appreciation.

janet m. webb


The only thing that could make a flower better is…a beautiful guest

And of course, the fact that tomorrow is Saturday is also good.  Have a marvel-filled weekend!

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In 2014, my husband and I went to France to visit his sister and her husband and to see a stage of the Tour de France.  His sister, a marvelous tour guide, drove us all around the Franche-Comté, including a visit to Château d’Oricourt, a feudal motte.  Motte isn’t a misspelling of “moat” and although a bit similar in effect, it “is a fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised earthwork called a motte, accompanied by an enclosed courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade.”  (Wikipedia)

After the Revolution, the town of Oricourt wanted to get rid of the fortifications and fill in the ditches, saying they were symbols of feudalism.  (Sound familiar??)  Thankfully for those of us interested in the past, the authorities declined this request (and hopefully they were far enough from Paris that no heads rolled) and the castle is now privately owned, but open to the public, and a national monument.

Where there are castles, there must be doors of one sort or another.  Let’s take a look.

Read the rest of this entry »

Just for fun this week, Cee’s asking us to share a photo or photos of a sunset, sunrise, or a night shot.  One wonderful thing about an iPhone (or other smartphone) is that I never have to miss a shot, even on a walk in the park.

copyright janet m. webb

Madonna might be a material girl, but what kind of material?  They’re not all the same.  Daily Writing Tips sent this interesting material to my inbox a few days ago and I thought you might appreciate it, too.  Sew, onward and don’t allow yourself to be worsted by any of these you don’t know.  Have you cottoned onto the appeal of apparel? Oddly enough, (see #22) in the mid-seventies, I was actually in Osnabrück, Germany.  I’m not making that up out of whole cloth and far as I know, none of these have been fabricated.  Okay, I’ll stop now, although I think they forgot cotton, “the fabric of our lives.”

25 Names of Fabrics, Wools, and Leathers Derived from Place Names

By Mark Nichol

This post lists and defines terms for apparel materials that have in common that the terms are derived from place names

1. angora: a type of wool from Angora rabbits, which originated near Ankara (previously Angora), Turkey
2. Bedford cord: a corduroy-like fabric, named after Bedford, England, or New Bedford, Massachusetts
3. calico: a type of cloth originally from Calicut, India
4. cambric: a type of cloth originally from Cambrai, France
5. cashmere: a type of wool and a woolen fabric from Kashmir goats, which come from the Kashmir region of India
6. chino cloth: a cloth originating in China (the name is Spanish for “Chinese”)
7. Cordovan leather: a type of shoe leather first produced in Cordoba, Spain
8. damask: a type of fabric named after Damascus, Syria
9. denim: a type of fabric originally called serge de Nîmes, or “serge of Nîmes,” after Nîmes, a town in France
10. dungaree: a type of denim cloth originating in Dongrī, India; pants or overalls made from this fabric are called dungarees
11. duffel: a cloth first made in Duffel, Belgium
12. Harris tweed: a type of handwoven tweed cloth originating on the island of Lewis and Harris and adjacent islands in Scotland (the name of the cloth type tweed is coincidental with the name of the river Tweed)
13. Holland (or Holland cloth): a type of linen originally made in various parts of Europe, including the province of Holland in the Netherlands
14. jaconet: a fabric originally from Puri, India (the word is derived from the name of the city’s Jagannath Temple)
15. jean: a type of fabric originating in Genoa, Italy
16. jersey: a type of knit fabric originating on the island of Jersey, next to France (but a dependency of the United Kingdom)
17. Mackinaw cloth: a woolen cloth used for thick, warm jackets (called Mackinaws or Macs) originally favored by lumberjacks and then hunters and fishermen in the Mackinac (or Mackinaw) region of Michigan
18. madras: a lightweight cloth originally from Madras, India (now called Chennai)
19. muslin: a lightweight fabric originally from Mosul, Iraq
20. Morocco leather: a type of leather originally from Moroccan goats
21. nankeen: a type of fabric originating in Nanjing, China (previously called Nanking or Nankin); also refers to pants made of this material, as well as the pale buff or yellow color of the fabric, a type of porcelain originating in the city, and a type of lace (often called nankins) and part of the name of numerous animals and plants featuring this color
22. osnaburg: a coarse cloth originally made in Osnabrück, Germany
23. suede: a type of leather made from the underside of animal skins, originally referenced in the French phrase gants de Suède (“gloves from Sweden”); similar-looking fabrics are referred to as “sueded silk” and so on
24. tulle: a type of fabric originating in Tulle, France
25. worsted: a type of wool whose name is derived from that of Worstead, one of the villages from which it originated; also, the name of a type of yarn and a category of yarn weight

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Image  —  Posted: March 12, 2018 in Quotes, Uncategorized
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The branches mask my view of the deer.  I hope to see more deer at the park this spring.

Other visual interpretations of “mask” can be seen on Debbie’s One Word Sunday challenge.  Feel free to drop by and take a look.

copyright janet m. webb