Posts Tagged ‘Armco-Ferro House’

I know.  This doesn’t look anything like a garage door.  But trust me, it is…in a way.  This door leads to the (flat) roof of the garage attached to our house in South Euclid, Ohio.  The house was built as an experimental home in the mid-thirties, designed by Charles Bacon Rowley.  (This shot in in the link dates from when we actually lived in the house. The windsock is the giveaway.)  Our house was the first porcelain enamel house in the world, although when we bought it, the dark brown enamel panels had, thankfully, been covered with white siding.  One former neighbor referred to it as “the haunted house.”  Here’s a somewhat similar house, the Armco-Ferro House, using the same ferroenamel.  It was constructed for the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition as an affordable house that could be mass-produced.

The attached garage had a flat roof, accessed from the inside of the house through this door at the top of the stairs.  When we bought the house, we thought that perhaps we could make the roof a type of second-story patio.  That never happened, although I did plant lettuce and other veggie in pots.  Only pole-vaulting deer would be able to eat them there!

This shot was taken after we had the interior of the house repainted and I repainted this door, the metal railing and edging, and re-stained the stairs and all the original hardwood floors in the entire four-bedroom house prior to us putting the house on the market.  I always love the symmetrical beauty of the staircase and railing as well as the invitation of the door, drawing the eye and the viewer upward.

© janet m. webb 2013