Posts Tagged ‘art’

Six-Word Saturday 1.14.22

The one sculpture Sue hadn’t found on her first visit to the Arboretum was tricky, as it was off the main road. We ran it down, though, and as we were walking toward it, I said it looked like a giant mushroom. I was right on target. 🙂 This is Mycelia.

Named for the filigreed, thread-like fungus, Mycelia extends reflections on the interconnectedness of humans and the natural world.

Mushrooms offer themselves as metaphor and image; the strange blooms of an otherwise invisible organism that runs beneath the forest floor. 

It was the end of a lovely day but we did get a good laugh from this quite suggestive fungus. 🙂

One last look at autumn colors before Sue dropped me off at the parking area, then headed home. I spent a bit of time (and money) in the gift shop before heading back to our friends’ house.

I’m glad you could walk along with me. The next days will be hit or miss as we’re making a flying trip back to Illinois to pick up a Toyota SUV. Why so far? Dealers in our part of Arizona are adding $7,000 on top of the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, an attempt I’ve heard at gaining back a portion of the money they’re losing by not having any stock. We went through the Costco program, which was a God-send: less than MSRP, the dealer has to add on a number of items, and Costco

Must preface this by apologizing for getting behind yesterday and not visiting many posts. Sometimes life happens.Nothing bad, just busy.

We have three more Popper sculptures to view before we leave Morton Arboretum, two today, the last tomorrow. Although this first might seem like “Split Personality” or “Two-Faced”, it is in reality nothing like either of those. According to the artist:

Recalling the inner rings at the centre of a tree trunk, Heartwood offers a lyrical meditation on the interconnectedness of humans and nature. While the work’s image might first appear fractured – with the bust of a woman cleaved in two – on closer looking, a resonant parallel becomes apparent. The heartwood of a tree marks its earliest growth and becomes, with the accumulation of annual ring, the plant’s spine; the wood dense and resistant to decay. 

The outer details are lovely too.

There were still a few flowers in bloom to go along with the autumn leaves.

You may or may not see the same meaning in “Basilica” as the artist did but even if not, it’s fine. Art is in the eye and heart and in the interpretation of the beholder.

Its title borrowed from the Greek word given first to places of gathering and later to those of worship, the work is an invocation to community and communion. While it may be without walls, with no ceiling but the sky, the artist lends Basilica’s two outstretched arms and the space they enclose the sacred resonance of a temple. 

On a very different artistic note, my husband and I have been watching lots and lots of rugby and one of the odd, funny things is that during or at the end of (or sometimes both) English matches and at least some of the 7’s tournaments, Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline” is played. It’s not just at rugby matches but the “good times never seemed so good” and the opportunity to belt out “So good, so good, so good” and “ba, ba, ba” has made it a favorite of a number of sporting events. That’s what I thought of when seeing this sculpture as it’s certainly reaching out. 🙂 My husband and I sing right along when whenever we hear it but I did not sing out loud this day. 🙂

Jo’s Monday Walk 12.12.22

The sun shone brightly, highlighting the gold of the leaves. We had to stop, get out, and just wonder at the quintessential beauty of autumn before moving on to the next sculpture. After several years in Arizona, the sight brought back memories of raking leaves, the girls jumping in piles of leaves, the crisp sound of leaves crunching underfoot.

“Rebellious leaves
going out
in a blaze of glory,
setting trees aflame
in riotous color.
Reluctant surrender
to rumors
of coming winter.”
― John Mark Green, Taste the Wild Wonder: Poems

“The leaves are changing; I feel poetry in the air.”
― Laura Jaworski

I do know the name of this sculpture: Ephemera. Beyond that, you’re on your own once again. 🙂 There are several chairs if you want to sit and contemplate for a bit.

Although we didn’t see flowers, we did spot what my plant app says is some sort of snowberry (or maybe an American beautyberry?) Whatever it is, the pop of color was vibrant.

I missed the best leaf color but trees like this made up for it. I should have saturated this photo to give more of a true sense of the brightness of the yellow.

I’d love to give you the name of this sculpture and I tried to figure it out from the map but to no avail. Just enjoy it for what it is and what you think it represents. I like to think of it as a wood sprite.

To give you a sense of size, here I am.

A bit more autumn color and inviting path waiting to take us farther in our explorations.

Yesterday we walked along the river walk in Aurora, Illinois and that’s where we are today, on the lookout for wildlife. Usually I see heron in the park but these attractive birds were sheltering beneath an overpass.

We saw this sign warning canoeists to stop but I’m not sure how they were going to get to accomplish that before going through the chute as the water was running right along and the sign was right at the place they were supposed to avoid. But we didn’t see any canoe wreckage so I guess it was alright. 🙂

It’s that time of year again, time for me to do the two-day drive to Wyoming (about 10+ hours each day) to spend 2 1/2 weeks in the Bighorn Mountains, time I crave each year. There’s very, very limited wi-fi access there and no phone access unless you have a satellite phone. You can get wi-fi but we have yet to do so. It’s become a discussion, but I do like not being online that much. I go on to check (and delete) email or to send a text or photo to family and friends but why be on vacation if I’m on the internet all the time? So until the second week in August, keep this California mural in mind to let you know how I appreciate you. And of course, there will be photos, many photos, and a surprise or two as well.


How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

Chorus from a popular song from the 1950’s

I founded this doggie on a window while out walking yesterday. It’s not for sale either and it doesn’t have the happiest expression but the artist did a lovely, colorful job.

If you spend enough time at Queen Creek Olive Mill, Queen Creek, Arizona, you might need to avail yourself of the facilities. On the way, look to the side and enjoy the wall art. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to take a photo without reflections off the glass but I thought you’d appreciate them anyway.

Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out. ~James Bryant Conant

Before we were ready to actually move to Arizona, my brother and I went around with a realtor to see what sort of homes were for rent. At one house I walked into the backyard to find a gigantic tortoise! The realtor was quite surprised. I don’t think the tortoise was included in the rent. Although not a speed demon, it got around quite a lot faster than this one at Tohono Chul who also looks a bit morose. It was however about the same size.

Tortoises can tell you more about the road than hares. ~Khalil Gibran

How you start is important, very important, but in the end it is how you finish that counts. It is easier to be a self-starter than a self-finisher. The victor in the race is not the one who dashes off swiftest but the one who leads at the finish. In the race for success, speed is less important than stamina. The sticker outlasts the sprinter in life’s race. In America we breed many hares but not so many tortoises.

~B. C. Forbes