Posts Tagged ‘Colmar’

Patti, you’ve set us quite a challenge here, which I’m hoping to meet with one photo and a poem (the latter’s formatting depending on my ability to deal with WP’s new editor.)

 This Colmar building is old,
the shutters certainly blue,
the cars (well, you guess),
all borrowed for you!
© janet m. webb

for Lens Artists Challenge #58

After an excellent lunch, it’s always good to take a walk.  Because we’re here during the week, there are slightly less tourists than usual, so let’s be thankful for that.  But you still have to be careful not to suddenly stop when you see just the right door (or a great patisserie.)  You might get rear-ended.

Old churches often have great doors and these first two prove that rule.

© janet m. webb

(more…)

Monday on the blog we were walking in France, tiring work, so let’s hop over to Colmar for a bit of lunch.  We ate at the same restaurant as the prior year, sitting outside by the river (Little Venice).  If you’d like to see a number of photos of places we saw and read a bit about them, click here (not my photos.)  It was hot, so we opted for salad and a glass of wine, while watching flat-bottomed boats filled with tourists pole by and swans glide past.

Colmar was part of France, then Germany, back to France, again to Germany, and finally ended up on the eastern edge of France.  Consequently, the architecture and food represent both cultures.  We opted for a lighter, more French lunch this visit.

This delicious, refreshing, filling, and beautifully presented salad had foie gras (front left), prosciutto (middle left), smoked salmon (hiding on the right), lots of beautifully cool, thinly-sliced veggies, and was topped with a crisp breadstick.  It was just what I needed before hitting the streets for photos of doors and other delights.  I would order it again in an instant!

© janet m. webb

There are flowers everywhere in Colmar.  Some of them are even found around doors, the perfect combination.  Right now, with winter hanging on and not much color to be found, it’s especially fun to browse through photos of summer and to remember strolling through the colorful streets of one of Europe’s most attractive cities.  I can also take pleasure in the thought that today is the last day of February and that perhaps spring is just around the corner.

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

for Thursday Doors

I was dreaming of France, so I “paged” through my files from Colmar and picked out three doors to share today. It’s been rather colds and icy outside and busy at work, so they were pleasant dreams. I hope they make your day more pleasant as well.

I’ve been rather busy the last two days with work, so my apologies for posts I’ve missed.  Pre-Valentine’s Day at a patisserie is rather busy as you can well imagine.  I hope you have a wonderful day, whether or not you do anything special.  Just remember those you love today and tell them that you do!  Any day is just the right time for that.

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

for Thursday Doors

I decided to go with an arches theme this week, but not the golden arches of McDo (long o sound) as it’s sometimes called in Europe.  These doors are from Colmar, the city I’ve featured before, that has vacillated between being part of French and part of Germany, but while always keeping not only a colorful past but colorful buildings and doors.  I also had a bit of fun playing with editing on the framing.  Welcome to December!  For more of this week’s Thursday Doors entries, click here.

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

 

 

(Little) Venice

Posted: October 15, 2016 in Travel
Tags: , , , ,

Colmar, France is noted for being picturesque and a part of that comes from the narrow boats plying their way up and down the section of the river Lauch that cuts through the colorful, half-timbered houses and businesses. After lunch under the awnings in the restaurant on the right, we, like so many others, took photos from the Saint-Pierre Bridge. We did not, however, take a boat ride.  All our exploration was done on foot.

© janet m. webb 2016 (more…)

Today let’s head back to the Alsace part of France, to Colmar in particular.  Half-timbered buildings and marvelous colors are what the old part of the city is known for and there are blocks and blocks of these beauties.  From this distance, you can’t see the door as well, but you can enjoy the colors.

Norm hosts Thursday Doors, one of the most enjoyable challenges out there.  Stop by or join in.

© janet m. webb 2016 (more…)

Cee’s taken a well-deserved break for a few weeks, so the Oddball Photo Challenge will run for more than one week.  In honor of that, I have more than one oddball.  🙂  However, all of them come from my July trip to France.  Enjoy!

This is something I certainly didn’t expect to see on the shelves of the local Colruyt store where my s-i-l shops!

© janet m. webb 2016

A decoration from “our” restaurant in Plombières-les-Bains, a sheepish Napoleon perhaps? (more…)

Colmar, France has been Colmar, France, Germany, France again, Germany once more, and now, finally, France yet again. It was even held for two years by the Swedish army during the Thirty Years War.  I’d seen Colmar on lists of places to see in Europe and on my last full day, we drove east, almost to Germany to see whether the lists were right.

It didn’t look promising at first, the navi guiding us through suburbs into what began to look like an industrial area.  Deciding to ignore Ms. Navi, we followed signs toward the downtown.  When we began to see tourists (other than ourselves), we parked on a quiet residential street a few blocks away.  All around us were large, beautiful Art Deco-style homes. After we finished gawking and exclaiming, we walked to the colorful half-timbered houses and businesses that make up  Colmar’s historic district, bisected by canals of the River Lauch, forming “Little Venice” and plied by long, narrow boats filled with sightseers.

Where there are historic, beautiful buildings, there mus,t of course, be doors.  Here are three of the many I stopped and stopped and stopped to photograph.

© janet m. webb 2016 (more…)