Posts Tagged ‘deer’

Ponder

Pond

for One Word Sunday: ponder/pond

Today’s challenge is “Getting Away”, something I enjoy doing as often as possible. However, we aren’t the only ones who like to get away.

Here’s what getting away looks like in McDowell Forest Preserve, Naperville, Illinois. I came around a corner of the trail to find both a fawn and a doe. I froze, allowing me to appear unthreatening for at least long enough to get some photos.

(I’m going to publish this post with four photos, the first of the fawn. But although all the photos show up in the draft, the preview doesn’t show it. I’ll see what happens and if it doesn’t work out, try editing the published version. Ahh, WordPress, why do you do these things??)

The doe was on the move at this point.

OK, I’ve tried everything I can think of to get that photo inserted but WP won’t let me do it. So instead I’ll use another one. This buck was happily standing in the path looking at me until a cyclist, out of my line of sight, came zooming along.

Getting away in Wyoming might look like this and it wasn’t even Thanksgiving! I love the expression the eye seems to have.

And getting away at the Riparian Preserve in Gilbert, Arizona might mean flying high. This guy seemed to have been carrying some sort of foliage with him.

Whatever getting away means to you, I hope you’ll be able to enjoy it as soon and as much as possible.

This topic makes me sad, but only because almost every photo I take is something that makes me feel wonderful and although that means I have lots of choices, it means I have too many choices, enough to almost put me in shutdown mode. So I decided to start with my happy place and see where that led. And where it led was to stay right there because what’s not wonderful about a place where you can look one way and see this…

…or look the other way and see this?

Or you might look out the window and see…

…or be walking along a trail and spot one of these showoffs.

And of course in the middle of June, you might look back from a 115F day to relish the thought of seeing a moose in falling snow, also in the middle of June. Very cool! 🙂

Patti’s set us a challenge today, that of sharing photos the convey emotion. I don’t take lots of photos of people, but humans aren’t the only ones who express emotions. What emotions do you see?

Can’t resist a reprise of my W.C. Fields cactus. 🙂

© janet m. webb
© janet m. webb

Wherever the neighborhood where we currently live, my neighborhood of heart is here in the Big Horn Mountains of Wyoming. I was fortunate enough to visit for three weeks this summer.

The neighborhood.

Some of the neighbors.

for Lens-Artists Challenge #123 – Found in the Neighborhood

Monday I headed for the park, isolation, and fresh air the order of a Coronavirus day, plus the need for soul food. I was blessed to see three groups of deer, none of whom spooked, allowing me to even get a halfway decent shot or two with my iPhone.

(more…)

Capital: first-rate; excellent

A capital couple from a walk last year. I rounded the corner, surprising both mother and baby but by not moving, I managed to observe them for a bit and yes, get some photos.

© janet m. webb
© janet m. webb

for Lens Artists Photo Challenge #82: capital

At this time of year, it’s not difficult to get to the park before sunrise. It’s my favorite time, a time when animals are often still out and when the park is usually rather empty (unless it’s the weekend.) In the last week or so, there’ve been some rather good sunrises, the sun first a small red-orange fingernail on the horizon, gradually growing larger until it emerges as a giant red ball.

(more…)
© janet m. webb

When I’m doing a photo walk, I don’t walk too quickly so as not to miss anything. That paid off this day as I came around a bend and saw this young buck. We both froze, I lifted my camera and started taking shots, he came toward me, then gradually relaxed enough to even start to graze… until a cyclist came pedaling from behind him. In a few seconds he was far enough into the meadow that I couldn’t even see his antlers.

© janet m. webb