Posts Tagged ‘details’

I had to add a bit of light to this photo of a French door because the position and intensity of the sun made it difficult to see the wonderful details. Then I needed to get closer so you could really appreciate them. Have to admit that I’m sorry I missed my yearly trip to France last year. Maybe this year. I’d love to get some more doors to share. In the meanwhile, enjoy this one. And don’t forget to have a bit of fun with today’s date, 1.21.21, which is a palindrome, meaning it reads the same forwards and backwards. Just thought you’d like to know. Getting my math geek on for you, Dan.

for Thursday Doors 1.21.21

Everything made by human hands looks terrible under magnification–crude, rough, and asymmetrical. But in nature every bit of life is lovely. And the more magnification we use, the more details are brought out, perfectly formed, like endless sets of boxes within boxes
― Roman Vishniac

I don’t believe that first sentence. Human hands makes some incredible things. But I firmly believe the rest of the quote and these are the details I love to see, record, and share. Patti challenges us to share details this week, so without further ado, here are mine.

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The buildings of Luxeuil have some marvelous details, but you have to look up to see them.  That can be dangerous when you’re trying to walk, whether on level pavement or not, and this certainly isn’t. So we’ll just stop here and take a good look at details on one building for now.

I know lots of you like arches and stone and windows, so this one’s for you.

© janet m. webb

Here’s another look at some Burgundian tiles. Those are fun, but there’s a lot more going here.  That one head is really sticking out and on top of the tower you can spot a sort of  lion rampant look, although I can’t tell whether or not it’s actually a lion.

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There’s something magical about train rides, something that transports me back to the days of my childhood, when we used to take the San Francisco Zephyr from Omaha to California to visit my grandparents. The train station, a vast, cavernous structure, filled with echoes of the life surging inside. I don’t remember, but I imagine it was also beautiful in a way that so few buildings are these days, due to a lethal combination of cost, lack of care in building, and indifference to architectural beauty or, possibly, different ideas of what constitutes that beauty.

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