Posts Tagged ‘doors’

Welcome back to Thursday Doors and happy 2018.  Norm, as always, thanks for hosting this group of door lovers.

This first shot was taken while we were waiting for the train into the city of Brotherly Love. I like the bright, cheerful colors.

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Philadelphia is one of the oldest cities in the U.S., so it has a variety of doors: classical, modern, and funky.  Doors aren’t the only things worth seeing, of course, but they certainly add lots of fun when wandering the streets as our daughter and I did recently.

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Before we get to the doors, do you remember my lesson on how to pronounce “Louisville?”  Well, in case you don’t, the visitor’s center downtown has this cute reminder.

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Now on to the last two theater/theatre doors I found on our walks back and forth from our motel to our daughter’s hotel.

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I promised you some more of those Louisville theater doors and here they are.  These two are double doors, allowing even more room for decorating and twice the fun.  I get a “Starry, starry night”/Vincent van Gogh feel from this first one.  It was such a pleasure to walk by these every day!

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

Knock on Norm’s Montreal blog door to find an amazing selection of entryways each week.

Although Louisville (say “Loo-a-vul” or Loo-a-ville” or see this guide) is known for horses, the Kentucky Derby, and bourbon whiskey (all bourbon and Scotch are whiskey/whisky, but not all whiskey/whisky is bourbon/Scotch and bourbon and Scotch aren’t the same…but are both whiskey/whisky), we were there a few weeks ago for the Ironman.  Our older daughter’s boyfriend was competing while we were there to cheer him on and have fun.

Who woke up one day and thought, “Hey.  Wouldn’t it be fun to swim 2.2 miles, then cycle 112 miles, and follow that by running a marathon (26.22 miles)?  And maybe I could get 2400 other people to participate.”?  That’s how many people (maniacs) started the race in Louisville this year.  I might be able to train for the cycling and the marathon, but that swim would NOT happen.  I’ll stick to sprinting, thank you very much.

Louisville has a nicely compact, revitalized downtown with a section on Fourth Street that’s the happening place.  As we walked from our motel a few blocks away towards Fourth Street, we passed a theater that made me break out my camera as well as in a happy dance.  One look and you’ll know why.  But I’ll give you three looks, the first one quintessential Loo-a-vul.

(A busy day again for me today, which means I won’t be getting to many, if any, posts until tonight or tomorrow.  Thanks for bearing with me on that!)

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

You’ll find more doors at Norm’s site.  Just view his post and then click on the link critter to let you visit doors all over the world.  Yes, we have this much fun every Thursday!

Phila-door-phia is a place where you can find doors ranging from très elegant to down-on-their-luck and everything in between.  No matter your taste, you’ll find doors that are tasty.  The theme song for my doors this week  might be the 1966 Spencer Davis Group’s Hit, “Gimme Some Lovin’.”  They definitely lean toward the down-on-their-luck side.

If you want to drop into More-door (where the shadows are), hobbit on over to Norm’s, where every door gets good lovin’.

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Even in a stately part of Philadelphia there’s room for a bit of whimsy. Yet, in keeping with the row houses around it, the details provide just enough counterpoint to even things out.

Our weekly doorman for Thursday Doors is Norman the Doorman, although not the “Norman the Doorman” of my childhood book. Our Norman certainly isn’t a mouse and he lives in Montreal.  But both Normans are cute and personable, so stop by the first for a visit (and links to all the doors) and check out the second at the library (or a summary by clicking the link.)

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Door

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Either sniffing the air or feeling we’re not good enough to be there

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Details