Posts Tagged ‘food’

I’m not sure if Jo’s walking today, but we’re on a mission to find good food no matter what.  Tighten your seat belts because we have to drive to our walk today at col du Mont de Fourche…unless you’d like to cycle to the top of a pass once part of the Tour de France.  Or you can give this big boy bike a try.

Usually our walks end with a tasty bite.  We’re going to turn that around: start and end with a walk and focus on the food in between.  Be a rebel with us!

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Monday on the blog we were walking in France, tiring work, so let’s hop over to Colmar for a bit of lunch.  We ate at the same restaurant as the prior year, sitting outside by the river (Little Venice).  If you’d like to see a number of photos of places we saw and read a bit about them, click here (not my photos.)  It was hot, so we opted for salad and a glass of wine, while watching flat-bottomed boats filled with tourists pole by and swans glide past.

Colmar was part of France, then Germany, back to France, again to Germany, and finally ended up on the eastern edge of France.  Consequently, the architecture and food represent both cultures.  We opted for a lighter, more French lunch this visit.

This delicious, refreshing, filling, and beautifully presented salad had foie gras (front left), prosciutto (middle left), smoked salmon (hiding on the right), lots of beautifully cool, thinly-sliced veggies, and was topped with a crisp breadstick.  It was just what I needed before hitting the streets for photos of doors and other delights.  I would order it again in an instant!

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

for One Word Sunday

© janet m. webb

for One Word Sunday

On Wednesdays (couldn’t we go back to Fridays??), timing is everything.  The Photo Challenge goes live (usually) at 11 am CST here in the Chicago area, so by 10:55, I’m usually sitting with my laptop, ready to start looking for photos.  But wait!!  What if my laundry is ready to come out at that time?  I don’t want it sitting in the machine getting wrinkled but I don’t have time to hang it up.  I have to be photo hunting!!  🙂  Hopefully this week the comments and pingbacks will work right away.  Anyone else having trouble getting posts to load in the Reader?

Today, everything is under control.  The laundry just went in, I have my opening paragraph written, I have a half-priced cappuccino for National Cappuccino Day, and I’m ready.  So here we go…

Today’s theme is…drum roll, please…”Temporary.” While there are all sorts of choices for this, my mind is on food and these wild French raspberries were very temporary indeed, but oh, so good!

© janet m. webb

Yesterday was our 33rd anniversary, which is why I was absent from the online world.  .  As my husband’s favorite food in the world might be watermelon, I thought I’d honor him by sharing a few things I’ve learned about watermelon since indulging him in this low-calorie, good-for-you treat as often as possible.  🙂

  1. Seedless watermelon aren’t, so don’t be taken aback or angry when you cut open that seedless melon, only to find little translucent “seeds”, really the coatings of seeds that haven’t matured.  They can’t mature and they can’t reproduce, so don’t plan on planting any to get your next year’s melons. *
  2. In China, watermelon consumers like to either eat the seeds from regular watermelon or toast them, while Americans tend to spit them out…or avoid them by buying “seedless” melons.
  3. No matter what you read about how to pick the right watermelon (tap them, look for a yellow patch, etc.), there’s no guarantee!  Just take your chances and enjoy.
  4. The best time to cut a watermelon is the day you’re going to put your garbage out for pick-up, unless you mulch, in which case you may feel free to cut one whenever you darn well please!  All those rinds are heavy, too!
  5. Watermelon rinds are great for putting on top of your shredded, private information.  Our recycling requires shredded material to be bagged which, to me, defeats the purpose, even though no one is likely to be able to reassemble our shreddings.  But put watermelon rinds or other wet food garbage on top and if anyone wants to try to steal information from that bag, have at it and good luck.
  6. I can see why someone invented watermelon rind pickles.  She probably got tired of throwing out all those rinds.
  7. The water part of watermelon isn’t just there for fun.  Once cut, the melon will lose, well, red water.  To keep the pieces lasting longer, drain that off every day…if the melon lasts that long.
  8. Watermelon, although about 92% water, is distressingly good for you.  (Don’t stop eating it, though!!)  It has significant levels of vitamins A, B6 and C, lots of lycopene, antioxidants and amino acids, and a bit of potassium. It’s also is fat-free, and low in sodium and calories (40 calories per cup.)
  9. If turned into a math formula: my husband’s ability to eat watermelon >>>>>the space in the fridge for the cut melon.  (That’s a greater-than sign to the 5th power, BTW.)
  10. Egyptians placed watermelons in the burial tombs of kings to nourish them in the afterlife.  For more fun facts about watermelon, head over to this LiveScience page.
  11. There’s lively debate about whether a watermelon is a fruit or a vegetable.  According to Natural Health ezine:  Most of us automatically assume that a watermelon is a fruit, but technically it is counted as a vegetable (The Oklahoma State Senate passed a bill on 17 April 2007 declaring watermelon as the official state vegetable, with some controversy surrounding whether a watermelon is a fruit.). It is related to the cucumber, squash and pumpkin plants. The watermelon is classified as Citrullus Lanatu. Regardless of whether the watermelon is a fruit or vegetable, it is known to be very healthy.
  12. The heaviest watermelon weighed 268.8 lbs./121.93 kg (I wouldn’t want to pay by the pound for that one).  My watermelon-loving spouse says that would be big enough to make a casket and that’s how he’d like to be buried.  He adds that would be a green burial in both senses of the word.  I’m not sure what I can add after that, so I guess that makes this the end of my post!  🙂

*But wait, there’s just a bit more.  For anyone interested in how you can grow seedless watermelon if the seeds really aren’t seeds, here’s an explanation from a horticultural newsletter.

The obvious question asked about growing seedless watermelons is: “How does one obtain seed of a seedless watermelon?” Obviously, you cannot save seed from a seedless watermelon. So, where do the seeds come from? Simply stated, the number of chromosomes (the threadlike bodies within cells that contain the inheritance units called genes) in a normal watermelon plant is doubled by the use of the chemical colchicine. Doubling a normal (diploid) watermelon results in a tetraploid plant (one having four sets of chromosomes). When the tetraploid plant is bred back, or pollinated, by a diploid or normal plant, the resulting seed produces a triploid plant that is basically a “mule” of the plant kingdom, and it produces seedless watermelons. Seed of seedless varieties are available from most major seed companies.

We interrupt our previously scheduled travelogue to bring you a scone recipe, because there’s always time for food.  Su, far away from me in New Zealand, a place we hope to visit one day, mentioned making savory scones with rosemary and feta.  I mentioned the scones I make and said I’d share the recipe. But the recipe came from a Moosewood cookbook and if I posted it, I’d be infringing on the copyright, even though I found the same recipe posted online.

What did I do?  I emailed the famous Moosewood Restaurant, asking them for permission..which I got within just a few hours, with their thanks for asking.

My addition is the option of dark chocolate chips.  Mix the ingredients as little as possible to keep them tender and only bake until just done to keep as moist as possible.

Hope you enjoy this, Su!  We’ll be headed back to Wyoming on Friday, after the Weekly Photo Challenge and Thursday Doors.  Make a batch of scones to munch on to go with your tea or coffee while reading blogs in the meantime.  And don’t post copyrighted information without asking permission, no matter what it is.

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