Posts Tagged ‘France’

For Wednesday’s Photo Challenge, I mentioned a funny story about the photo of a church.  My s-i-l was driving my husband and me around the roads of rural France, seeing sights and generally having fun.  We were walking through a small village, when my s-i-l said, “Look. This is the first Lutheran church in  France!”

As we’re Lutheran, of course we thought we should go in and see it (besides the fact that it was very old.)  But the door was locked and there were no people to be seen anywhere.  After walking around the outside, we headed for the car.  Suddenly a man came out from the building across the street and asked if we wanted to see the church.  He took us into the entryway and told us that the key was hidden behind a painting.  He moved the painting to the side, gave us the key, and asked us to put the key back when we were done!  His kindness and trust had us smiling and shaking our heads.

The unusual thing about this church was the wood-burning stove partway down on the left side.  I can imagine that side of the church had the most parishioners sitting there in winter!!

© janet m. webb 2014

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Nancy’s challenging us to show something edible this week and although I love her choice of berries (a favorite of mine as well), I also love bread.  In a world filled with no-carb diets, I crave them.  Pasta is another of my choices. I saw these beautiful loaves at a French farmer’s market. They beg for a bit of cheese or some Normandy butter and a lovely glass of red.

© janet m. webb 2014

 

 

“Against the Odds” is the theme for this week’s challenge and I think you’re unlikely to find a crossing sign like this very often.  Yes, all of these were present in the area where the narrow French road twisted through a small farm. Looks a bit like a fairy tale illustration to me or a child-as-Pied-Piper sign.

© janet m. webb 2014

 

I’ve featured doors from Villersexel before on Thursday Doors, as well as the chateau that distinguishes this town of under 2,000 residents.  In 1871, the French and the Prussians battled here, during which time the mostly-timber chateau was destroyed by fire.  In the same year, the owner looked for an architect working with more fire-resistant materials, choosing the young Gustave Eiffel (yes, that Eiffel) who was working with iron.  Shall I say that Eiffel developed into a towering talent?  Perhaps not.

At any rate, the chateau is completely furnished in this period. Lafayette reportedly lived in the current Chateau, while Charles De Gaulle and Winston Churchill both stayed there.  However, most of the people live in less exalted homes, yet homes with interesting doors.  These three represent three different sorts of doors, something for everyone.

The colorfully elegant…

© janet m. webb 2016

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Beauty certainly is in the eye of the beholder.  While I was in France, one of my s-i-l’s dogs was very sick, vomiting throughout the day and night, leaving her with blankets and rugs that needed to be cleaned continuously.  But in France, electricity is expensive and washers and dryers aren’t enormous.  So when we discovered these washers and driers outside a store in a nearby town, we were elated.  They were a bargain and we could get grocery shopping done while we waited. (We were also fortunate in that we never had to wait, something that doesn’t always happen.)  Those were some of the most beautiful doors of the entire trip!

© janet m. webb 2016

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It’s almost Christmas, our girls are home, and my s-i-l is on her way from Ohio.  I’m working today, then going directly to practice tonight for all the special music we’ll be doing for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day services.  The holiday busy-ness and family time are with us, everyone is fleeing rushed.  So let’s take a quick trip back to summer in France and carve out a few minutes to relax, take a few breaths, and just enjoy.

My turn for a French door with bicycle.

© janet m. webb 2016

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I decided to go with an arches theme this week, but not the golden arches of McDo (long o sound) as it’s sometimes called in Europe.  These doors are from Colmar, the city I’ve featured before, that has vacillated between being part of French and part of Germany, but while always keeping not only a colorful past but colorful buildings and doors.  I also had a bit of fun playing with editing on the framing.  Welcome to December!  For more of this week’s Thursday Doors entries, click here.

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016