Posts Tagged ‘French doors’

I’m once again trolling the archives of last year’s visit to France for my Thursday Doors entry this week. I’m sad to say there will be no visit this year but I can’t imagine having to wear a mask for all the time it would take to get from the Phoenix airport to the Basel airport–with possibly two stops and all that time in the air! However, with the ease of virtual travel, we can zip over for a few quick stops.

First stop is a favorite spot–Luxeuil-les-Bains. Remember that les bains means the baths and this is one of the places in the area where you can get into hot water and have it be a good thing.

I do love shutters and a balcony filled with flowers. Since many doors open almost right into the street or sidewalk, it would be much nicer to sit up above the crowd.

(more…)

Since I’m unlikely to be visiting France this year, let’s take a look back at my visit last fall and a chapel not far from where my sister-in-law lives. It’s the Chapelle Sainte-Ursule (Esboz) which we drove past many days. But when we finally stopped, the door was locked.

I tried to look up information about it, but there didn’t seem to be any. The Encyclopaedia Britannica has this to say about St. Ursula:

Saint Ursula, (flourished 4th century, Rome; feast day October 21), legendary leader of 11 or 11,000 virgins reputedly martyred at Cologne, now in Germany, by the Huns, 4th-century nomadic invaders of southeastern Europe. The story is based on a 4th- or 5th-century inscription from St. Ursula’s Church, Cologne, stating that an ancient basilica had been restored on the site where some holy virgins were killed. Mentioned again in an 8th- or 9th-century sermon, the number of maidens increased to several thousand, reportedly martyred under the Roman emperor Maximian. In Jacobus de Voragine’s Legenda Aurea (1265–66; Golden Legend) Ursula is a British princess who went to Rome accompanied by 11,000 virgins and was killed with them by the Huns on the return from the pilgrimage. The discovery at Cologne in 1155 of an ancient Roman burial ground believed to contain these martyrs’ relics inspired additional legends. Ursula is the patron of the Order of St. Ursula (Ursulines), a congregation of nuns dedicated to educating girls. In the 1969 reform of the Roman Catholic church calendar her feast day was reduced to observances in certain localities.

Here’s a closer look at the door as well as the First World War monument remembering the children of Esboz-Brest “dead for France.” (The town hall building, which you can see at the link, looks similar to the chapel in style only larger.) You’ll find monuments to those who died in WWI and WWII all over France, a somber reminder of the past.

(more…)

This week we have more random French doors, but with a bit of a linguistic twist. The first is the door to a cave. No, not a door to a cave, but to a cave (cahv), French for cellar. Of course it is a bit like a cave, but a cave that houses wine sometimes or, in this case, a variety of spirits for the distillery above. In a very un-American way, there was an entire bottle of whisky with small glasses for tasting and no one there to be sure you didn’t have two samples! Quelle horreur!*

This is a wild boar door. 🙂 Sangliers can cause all sorts of destruction, despite how cute these look on the outside of this small hunting cabin. From experience I can testify that the meat when smoked is delicious!

(more…)

Shelter-in place, self-isolation, and quarantine are all for the body, but mind is free to roam the world, so tighten your seatbelts and put your tray tables in their upright and locked positions. We’re on our way to the Franche-Comté. See that? I made a little rhyme.

As all Thursday Doors peeps know, gates count as doors and that’s the way I’m going today. Enjoy.

(more…)

For Thursday Doors

As you can no doubt tell from the title, these three doors come from France, at a former monastery now artists’ colony. Of course at Thursday Doors, we consider the doors art as well.

In this time of social distancing/isolation/quarantining , the internet provides us with the opportunity of social interaction without fear of sickness. Today even more than ever, this is a true blessing.

I’ve also seen children out playing in their yards, shooting baskets in the drive way, or walking with their parents. I’ve seen couples walking hand in hand. I’ve not seen phones. This too is a small series of blessings in a time when we would do well to remember the good.

(more…)

Just outside the village of Raddon-et-Chapendu there’s a brocante shop, usually closed when we’ve gone past. Brocante is French for a secondhand shop, more rudely translated as a junk shop. This one was packed with all sorts of objects, but our focus is on the doors, both outdoors and indoors, so to speak. If you’re tempted to buy, keep in mind the 50-pound weight limit on luggage! Oddly enough, we were greeted by the music of Pink Martini.

Will either of these doors fit your needs? A little TLC might be in order first though, unless shabby chic is your desire.

(more…)

It’s Thursday once more. Am I the only one who feels as though the days are flying by? The good news is that I have all the Christmas decorating done, so my husband and I can enjoy it. The tree is in the garage until our younger daughter gets home this weekend and then she and my husband will decorate that.

On Saturday, I went to an open house at á la folie, a French pastry shop in Naperville. I enjoyed tasting their samples and then ordered a Buche de Noel to celebrate our last Christmas here. That got me thinking about France, so I pulled up three more doors from Luxeuil-les-Bains. They’re tasty in their own ways and also completely calorie-free.

(more…)

Luxeuil-les-Bains has a plethora of attractions, including les bains, the thermal baths that were enjoyed by Celts and Romans. I can show you two great bakeries, a coffee and tea shop for relaxation, a number of good restaurants (and several not so good), beautiful churches, an batch of sarcophagi, a bountiful farmers market on Saturday morning…and doors.

I’ve photographed quite a few doors over the last visits, so hopefully I’m not repeating myself (at least too much.) These three were almost next door to each other, making it easy for me.

You get some great tiles at no additional charge. Maybe we should have come back at night.

© janet m. webb
(more…)

Sometimes it just takes one and nothing else can match it.  This door from Luxeuil-les-Bains, France was the one for me and, I hope, for you in this edition of Thursday Doors.  It felt very Audrey Hepburn.

Fashions fade, style is eternal.
Yves Saint Laurent

© janet m. webb

One should either be a work of art, or wear a work of art.
Oscar Wilde