Posts Tagged ‘Friday flowers’

With a name like that, you’d expect something special…and you’d get it. I’m not sure if fairies use it for dusting or if you dust fairies with it, but either way I’d love to have a supply of them in my cleaning closet or in my garden.

Scrolling through some photo files from a few years ago, I came across this photo taken in Illinois where water is generally abundant. I’m not likely to get many dew/raindrop photos in Arizona, but I also wouldn’t be getting spoonbill or cacti shots if we were still in Illinois. 🙂 This is a close-up with a telephoto lens, meaning I had to stand about 6′ away. When I took my Nikon, I didn’t always want to carry extra lenses. Needs must.

These are from McDowell Forest Preserve in Naperville, Illinois. Not many new flowers around here right now, but these bring back some good memories. I don’t remember what these are called, but there were only one or two plants in the entire park. In fact, I was going to go the lazy woman’s route and just say I didn’t know what they were because it’s not always easy trying to identify a flower or tree online. But I decided to give it a try, looking up “wildflowers Illinois” via DuckDuckGo and lo and behold, I found a photo right on the first page! They’re Royal Catchfly, (Silene regia) the name probably deriving from the sticky hairs that catch insects. These plants have endangered status in Illinois, so I guess I was fortunate to see them!

Red is an uncommon color among prairie plants because many pollinating insects (e.g., bees) are insensitive to this range of the light spectrum. However, some butterflies perceive red, and for this reason are attracted to such flowers. The flowers of Royal Catchfly have a design that favors butterflies as pollinating agents: They have a proboscis that is sufficiently long to reach the nectar at the bottom of the long narrow tube that is formed by the calyx, while the flared petals provide a colorful landing platform for their legs. Illinois Wildflowers

Evidently they’re also pollinated by the ruby-throated hummingbird, according to Wikipedia. At any rate, they’re very attractive!

Had to laugh because evidently I looked them up before. When I typed the name into my tags, it popped up. 🙂 Just didn’t remember what I’d forgotten.

Even though I arrived on the Bighorns in mid-July, there was still a plethora of wonderful wildflowers.