Posts Tagged ‘George Washington’

Although I left for yesterday’s photo challenge, let’s go back to Valley Forge National Park for another day.  Despite being located there and being a national monument to George Washington,  the chapel doesn’t belong to the park, but is a beautiful, active Episcopal parish.

The cornerstone for Milton Medary’s Gothic Revival building was laid in 1903, but construction didn’t begin until 1912.  The exterior was finished five years later, the interior nice.  Wikipedia further tells us:

Noted ironsmith Samuel Yellin produced the wrought iron gates, hardware & locks. He was one of many artisans to produce sculptures, stonework, stained glass and metal work.[6] The interior woodwork was supplied by Belgian-American cabinetmaker Edward Maene (1852–1931).[7]

Although there are beautiful sculptures, furniture, and stained glass windows (food for upcoming posts), today’s focus, as usual on Thursday, is on doors.  Here are a few that grace the chapel.  Be sure open the door to our host Norm’s blog to see what he has on offer today and click on the blue linky critter to see doors from around the world.

© janet m. webb 2017

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You say you’ve heard that before?  ‘Tis true.  I cannot tell a lie.  (You say you’ve heard that before as well?) You did know he had to sleep somewhere, right?  A number of somewheres!  Well, this is one of the somewheres!

During the time the Continental Army bivouacked at Valley Forge, most of the men slept in wooden huts that they’d made laboriously by hand (and axe.)  I always had the impression that they nearly froze in tents, but during our recent trip to Valley Forge, I found out that wasn’t true, at least the tent part.  Many of them probably felt as though they were freezing, dressed inadequately and without, in many cases, proper shoes or boots, and for much too long, food supplies were inadequate.

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Although I consider voting to be one of the greatest privileges of being a U.S. citizen and one in which I participate regularly, the overt animus during an election year is, to me, one of the signs of a society in decline. I may disagree with your political beliefs or those of the people in office, but I will always strive to behave in a civilized, adult manner when expressing that disagreement. What I see online reveals some unpleasant things not only about people in general, but sometimes about people I consider friends. Can anyone say “Civility?”   Evidently not.

I think this man would be spinning in his grave at the state of the union these days. However, in this photo, he’s looking rather a-door-able.

© janet m. webb 2014