Posts Tagged ‘John Muir’

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We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.
~John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra

I’m by nature and nurture an optimist, despite much evidence to the contrary, an optimist who loves to travel to all sorts of places: lake, ocean, desert.  But when I’m in the mountains, it’s as if I were a jigsaw puzzle missing one small piece; a picture complete as is, but reaching its full beauty when that one piece is in place.

I don’t go to France for mountains.  My s-i-l and b-i-l live in the ancient forest of the Vosges, hilly and peaceful (except during hunting season.)  On this trip, however, during one of our patented driving trips of exploration, we ended in the Haute (High) Vosges.  The road twisted, turned, and climbed and with each turn, my spirits rose and my heart and soul filled.

If you’ve visited Germany’s Black Forest, you know the Haute Vosges.

There is great similarity between the Vosges and the corresponding range of the Black Forest on the other side of the Rhine: both lie within the same degrees of latitude, have similar geological formations and are characterized by forests on their lower slopes, above which are open pastures and rounded summits of a rather uniform altitude; furthermore, both exhibit steeper slopes towards the Rhine and a more gradual descent on the other side.
~Wikipedia

Here are some of the views above the village of Kruth that kindled my enthusiasm, made my nerves quiver, and filled every pore and cell.

© janet m. webb 2016

Enormous woodpiles for winter heat are everywhere. These are some of the smaller stacks we saw.

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.”
~John Muir, The Mountains of California

© janet m. webb 2016

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity.
~John Muir, Our National Parks

© janet m. webb 2016

I am losing precious days. I am degenerating into a machine for making money. I am learning nothing in this trivial world of men. I must break away and get out into the mountains to learn the news.
~John Muir

© janet m. webb 20016

 

Beauty and bread

Posted: June 28, 2016 in Quotes
Tags: , , , ,

It’s good to travel and it’s good to be home…and to have another trip at the end of the week.  But it does cut short time to get things done, so I simply had some fun with some photo editing and a quote.  I hope you enjoy both.

© janet m. webb 2016

It’s Friday once again (are there more Fridays and Mondays than other days?) and time again for the Weekly Photo Challenge.   It’s another grey day in Chicagoland, threatening more rain that we no longer need.  I’d send some to California if I could just figure out the logistics.  But here at WordPress, there have been several weeks of colorful themes to brighten the days, and I’ve enjoyed them.

This week’s theme is “Muse .”  Nature tends to be my muse for photography, but there’s a specific place that I come back to fill my cup: these mountains in Wyoming. While any mountains will do, as will the ocean or a walk in “my” park, this is where that last piece of the puzzle slots into place, making me feel whole again.

Sit back with a cup of your favorite tea (or coffee, if you must) and enjoy the photos and stories for this week.  Have a wonder-filled weekend, filled with time for rest and refreshment.

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity.
John Muir, Our National Parks

IMG_5693

Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction – so easy to lapse into – that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us.”
Robert Macfarlane, Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.
~John Muir, The Mountains of California

IMG_6214

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity…
~John Muir

IMG_6174

Mountains seem to answer an increasing imaginative need in the West. More and more people are discovering a desire for them, and a powerful solace in them. At bottom, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction – so easy to lapse into – that the world has been made for humans by humans. Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. Mountains correct this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. They pose profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, a modesty in us.
~Robert Macfarlane, Mountains of the Mind: Adventure in  Reaching the  Summit