Posts Tagged ‘Penn Museum’

for One Word Sunday

for One Word Sunday

Norm, our host at Thursday Doors, is doing a retrospective of his 2019 doors and asked us to do so as well. I’d planned to, but I’m too short of time with family coming home, practice for our Christmas service, etc. So I’m “cheating” a bit by taking you back to the Penn Museum, but not with literal doors. I have a few shots that are doors to the past in Central America and a civilization not many know much about.

This metate (grinding stone) and mano (roller) from Honduras is one of my favorite items in the museum. Its beauty and grace for a simple, daily task of grinding corn and other foods attract me. The large size indicates the high status of the owners/users.

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Walk into the Penn Museum and you’re face to face with a sphinx, the largest in the western hemisphere.

In October 1913 a colossal granite sphinx arrived in Philadelphia to great excitement. Weighing close to 15 tons, the sphinx was the second largest ancient Egyptian monument ever to come to America (after New York’s Central Park obelisk that had arrived in 1881). The sphinx, over 3,000 years old, has inscriptions of the famous pharaoh Ramses II (Ramses the Great) who reigned ca. 1200 BCE.Penn Museum website

As you can see, the head is badly damaged while the body and cartouches are in excellent shape. At some point, the body, up to the shoulders, was buried in sand, preserving it. Eventually, the entire sphinx was buried before being discovered.

Let’s head over to the Egyptian gallery. There’s so much to see! On this head, the cobra and the royal headdress seem to indicate a Pharaoh. Looks like he’s meditating. 🙂

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for Six Word Saturday

On Tuesday I introduced you to the Penn Museum of Archeology and Anthropology, Queen Puabi, Ur, and fabulous jewelry. Today we’re looking at doors. This first one is the imposing front door, but not one used by the general public. I believe it might be used when part of the facility is rented for a wedding or similar event. What about that tile or brick work?

Glass makes taking a photo without reflections difficult to impossible. However, this door in the African gallery is worth putting up with the reflections!

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All that glitters is, in this case, gold. During our Thanksgiving visit to our daughter’s in Philadelphia, we spent time at the Penn Museum, a jewel of a museum. If I lived in Philadelphia, I’d have a membership so that I could take time in each gallery individually and then go home and read more about that era. I love history and this museum brings it alive. Let’s look at just a few items from the ancient city of Ur.

Ur, modern Tall al-Muqayyar or Tell el-Muqayyar, Iraq, important city of ancient southern Mesopotamia (Sumer), situated about 140 miles (225 km) southeast of the site of Babylon and about 10 miles (16 km) west of the present bed of the Euphrates River. In antiquity the river ran much closer to the city; the change in its course has left the ruins in a desert that once was irrigated and fertile land. The first serious excavations at Ur were made after World War I by H.R. Hall of the British Museum, and as a result a joint expedition was formed by the British Museum and the University of Pennsylvania that carried on the excavations under Leonard Woolley’s directorship from 1922 until 1934.

Encyclopedia Britannica

Queen Puabi obviously rocked the jewelry! But who was she? The Penn Museum site tells us:

The forensic examination of her remains, undertaken by London’s Natural History Museum, indicates that she was roughly 40 years old when she died. She stood just under five feet tall. Her name and title are known from the short inscription on one of three cylinder seals found on her person. The two cuneiform signs that compose her name were initially read as “Shub-ad” in Sumerian. Today, we think they should be read in Akkadian as “Pu-abi” (or, more correctly, “Pu-abum,” meaning “word of the Father”). Her title is “eresh” (sometimes mistakenly read as “nin”), and means “queen.”

You can read more by clicking here.

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