Posts Tagged ‘personal’

Recently, I had two experiences with apologies, one bad, the other good.  The “bad” was one I wasn’t able to give.  My manager at work called to tell me another employee had complained about me.  She wouldn’t tell me who complained or what the complaint was about, which I to some extent understand.  But that robbed me of the opportunity to know how to change and also the chance to apologize to the person who complained.  I couldn’t think of any event that might have caused it and I felt bad for several days.

The second experience was something hurtful said to me, although not about me, in front of a group of friends.  Although I knew the person didn’t mean it to be hurtful, it was a remark that caused everyone else to laugh and me to retreat inside myself for the rest of the meeting and until I went to bed that night.  It’s easy to know I should just let it go, but hard to do!

The difference was that the morning after that second incident, I received an email from the person who’d made the remark, saying he shouldn’t have said what he did and asking for my forgiveness. I emailed back, saying that yes, I’d felt bad, thanking him for the apology, and accepting it.

A sincere apology, although it doesn’t take negate the initial hurt, offers the hurt person the chance to let go of the hurt and the opportunity to heal the relationship.  It may also, in the same way the healed site of a broken bone is stronger than before it broke, make the relationship stronger.  A missed chance can do the opposite.  Of course, an insincere apology adds insult to injury and even a sincere one doesn’t mean the other person will accept it, but don’t pass up the need for a heartfelt apology when you’ve wronged someone.  Even if that person doesn’t forgive you, you’ll be free to move ahead.

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Summer is forest fire season in the west and this year was no exception.  Fortunately, none of the fires was close to us, but smoke from these fires often travels hundreds of miles.  One day there was so much smoke that it was as if we were in a thin fog, with a smell sharp enough to make me feel that the fire was just over the ridge.  This is what it looked like later in the day.  The peak just to the left of center is Black Tooth, a bit over 13,000′ high and still adorned with patches of snow in August, as were a number of other peaks this year.

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A number of years ago, a fire got close enough to the cabins for us to see the flames, forcing all of us to evacuate.  The fire jumped part of the Red Grade Road, but thankfully, our cabins and almost all others in the area were spared.  I never want to be that close or closer to a forest fire again.

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​Ok, the sun’s out. Let’s go for a ride. I’ll ride Lacy and I’ll put you on Cookie. She’s a sweetheart, goes well (and smoothly), and won’t do anything crazy. I’ll give you tips as we go, but if we’re in front, you’ll be fine. Horses always like to be the second or third in line. That way, if any monsters come, they’ll get the first horse and give the others time to get away. 🙂 Anyway, there are so many places to go that are difficult to get to otherwise, unless you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and walk after you can’t drive any farther.  Yes, I know the video appears to be sideways (for some unknown reason), but when you click on the arrow, it will show correctly.  Mine is not to wonder why.​

(Just changed my post title so I can join Six-Word Saturday. Glad you could come along for the ride.)

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​In the mid-seventies when my dad came home one day talking about an opportunity to buy a cabin in Wyoming’s Bighorn Mountains, I heard the words “mountains” and “horses” together. That’s all I needed to know. My vote was “Yes.”

© janet m. webb

Do you ride?  If not, don’t worry.  Among the almost 50 horses are plenty of gentle ones and I can give you pointers.  We ride Western, with cowboy-style saddles, and up here, we can ride for miles and miles, usually without encountering another person or rider. Western saddles are built for comfort and riding long distances and the saddle horn, used by cowboys to tie one end of a rope is great for holding on to if needed. Just remember the rule:  if you go through a gate that’s open, leave it open.  If it was closed, close it.  There are cattle in some places and letting them out from where they should be and into where they shouldn’t is a big no-no.

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By the time many of you read this, I’ll be in my van on the road to Wyoming.  So it’s the start of a three-week blogging break for me.  Our internet connection at 7,000′ is quite slow, which is fine, as I’ll be spending my time riding, reading, hiking, and relaxing.  My parents will also be visiting for about a week, although unfortunately, my husband can’t make it. But I imagine I’ll be popping in to Instagram from time to time.  In the meantime, have a wonderful time wherever you are and whatever you’re doing.  When I get back, I’ll have lots of information and photos for posts, although I haven’t finished with France yet.  Isn’t travel grand?  Blessings to all of you and I’ll be back soon.

Headed toward this view…

© janet m. webb

© janet m. webb

Leavin’ on a jet plane

Posted: May 29, 2017 in Travel
Tags: , , , ,

It’s that time of year again, time for a trip to France and, because of that, time for a cyber break.  But you know I’ll be taking hundreds of photos that I’ll share with you when I get home, so in the meantime, those of you in my hemisphere, have a glorious spring.  For those of you in the southern half of the world, may fall be colorful.  See you in June.

© janet m. webb