Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia’

This will be my last Thursday Doors entry for a few weeks, as I’ll be leaving for another visit to France on Memorial Day (and yes, I’ll be taking photos.)  So I’m pulling out all the stops, featuring lots of red doors.  Only a few blocks from PAFA, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where our daughter attended school and where she now works, is North Mole Street, a one-block alley of historic row houses.

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, Philadelphia is not only known for its row houses, but for its alleys, usually one block in length, pedestrian only, filled with “Trinity” houses, supposedly named for their three rooms, one to each floor – as in Father, Son and Holy Ghost. (Click on the link to read more about the alleys.)  These alleys have been mostly renovated and are home to many young, well-to-do residents.

Thursdays Doors is the brain child of our Montreal connection, Norm and his middle-aged mind.  We’re so glad he came up with it!  Thanks, Norm.  You’ve opened doors all over the world through this challenge.

© janet m. webb

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Not long ago, we took a few days and went to Philadelphia again for a daughter visit.  While heading back to her apartment one afternoon through an area undergoing renovation, I spotted this duo.  They encapsulate the neighborhood perfectly.

To open the door to one of the most enjoyable challenges on the internet, walk/run/drive/crawl/dance/skip/ski (in winter)/cycle/roller skate…however you move, just get over to Norm’s blog and take part or just click on the link to view the entries.

© janet m. webb

I’ve lived in basements and I’m not a fan.  I like light too much and being able to look out the windows.  But if you live downstairs, you might as well have a great door.  Some good stonework is always an advantage, too.  Just be careful on those steps when it’s slippery.

Whether upstairs or downstairs, you can always look forward to Thursday Doors, the challenge that opens doors around the world for you.  Our doorkeeper, Norm, can be found at his blog, Norm 2.0.  That’s also where you  can do a Dr. Who and go through the portal and visit doors everywhere, although not via a telephone booth.

© janet m. webb 2017

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No dearth of photograph-worthy doors in the City of Brotherly Love. It’s filled with lovely doors of all sorts.  Today’s trio runs the gamut from intricately designed to simple and colorful to one that’s missing an essential ingredient.

Thursday Doors never misses any ingredients as cooked up a-door-ably by our amiable chef from Montreal, Norm.  Hopefully he’s no longer snowed under, but no matter.  The door to world-wide doors is always open if you click on the blue linky critter on his site.

© janet m. webb 2017

© janet m. webb 2017

© janet m. webb 2017

“Surprise” is the theme of this week’s photo challenge.  As Jen mentioned in her example, I’ve often been surprised by what appears in a macro shot, especially if it’s taken with my phone in bright sunshine!  Little critters that I didn’t even notice look like sci-fi creatures when viewed on my laptop or iPad.

I like to be surprised by wit and word play is one of the things I most enjoy.  So you might imagine the surprised happiness the name of this shop gave me when I chanced to look across a Philadelphia street and see it.

© janet m. webb 2017

 

Philadelphia is universally known as the City of Brotherly Love.  It’s probably mostly unknown as “City of Homes.” The Philadelphia Encyclopedia says:

Lining Philadelphia’s straight, gridiron streets, the row house defines the vernacular architecture of the city and reflects the ambitions of the people who built and lived there. Row houses were built to fit all levels of taste and budgets, from single-room bandbox plans to grand town houses. The row house was easy to build on narrow lots and affordable to buy, and its pervasiveness resulted in Philadelphia becoming the “City of Homes” by the end of the nineteenth century. As Philadelphia emerged as an industrial epicenter, the row house became synonymous with the city and was held up as an exemplar for egalitarian housing for all.

The oldest residential city street in the US, Elfreth’s Alley  in Philadelphia, is a showplace of 18th century row houses still in use. If you missed my post and Thursday Doors entry about it, just click on the highlighted link (the first one).  Most people in Philadelphia live in a row house.

© janet m. webb 2017

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Door?  What door?  You can’t miss it, but you don’t really notice it.  Just goes to show Philadelphia is more than historic doors!

Norm, our fearless leader, can be spotted periodically (but every Thursday) on his blog. You can also cat-ch other entries to the Thursday Doors challenge by clicking on the linky critter in his Thursday blog entry. It’s paws-atively addictive!

© janet m. webb 2017