Posts Tagged ‘Riparian Preserve at Water Ranch’

One Word Sunday: found

Six-Word Saturday 4.9.22

“Wild ducks in North America are divided into two broad groups: the dabblers or paddle ducks, and the divers.”
― Anonymous

Most people come to the Preserve to see the birds but at this time of year, there aren’t nearly as many and there aren’t as many kinds. There are plenty of ducks, though, either dabblers or divers. This handsome male ring-necked duck falls into the diving category although at the Preserve where in one lake you’re allowed to feed the birds, the minute you walk onto the bridge, the flotilla heads towards you at top speed expecting goodies. I’m always a disappointment to them.

I believe this to be a sort of exorcist mallard, its head turned around while resting. (I never saw the movie, but I do know her head spins around at some point. His does not.) Forward or backward, he sports such lovely, deep colors on his head. Mallards are dabblers, going after food in the iconic duck-bottom-up pose. To see a group of them doing that makes me smile every time. 🙂 See?

“In terms of habitat, ducks can be found anywhere that is wet.”
― Victoria de Rijke, Duc
k

This trip I finally saw a female ring-necked duck (although I can’t really detect a ring on either of them). Her coloring isn’t as dramatic as the male’s but she looks more soft and mother-y, don’t you think? I can see ducklings following her or pushing up under her wings while dad’s sharp eye watches for danger. This is the first time I noticed the little hook at the end of the beak, too. The better to snag something to eat, my dear.

“Be like a duck, paddling and working very hard inside the water, but what everyone sees is a smiling and calm face.”
― Manoj Arora, From the Rat Race to Financial Freedom

I think her face looks calm although I doubt she’s worried about financial freedom. But who knows? I can’t pretend to know what a duck thinks. I do think that this is the end of this post. I hope you’re having fun dabbling in this and that today or perhaps are diving into something you really enjoy (hopefully not your food.) I’m going to duck out to do some dabbling a/o diving of my own. Enjoy Wednesday!

“Who’s s/he when s/he’s at home?” is a colloquial way of saying “Hey, just who is that person?” At the Preserve, as Lisa (Micro of the Macro) and I observed, there were quite a few at home in the saguaro cacti apartments many birds call home. The saguaro cactus is an iconic foundational plant of the Southwest, providing much more than just apartments for birds but some of the cacti are so riddled with holes, it’s a wonder they’re still standing. On this day, we observed a number of the residents. This mourning dove couple obviously is into (literally) the little house craze.

Not exactly a high-end mattress but this bird seems to be quite comfy in her nest of twigs. With all the cactus spines surrounding the next, I imagine she’ll be undisturbed by any predators.

Anybody home?

Is this a flicker or a woodpecker? I’m not sure but a group of flickers is called a “menorah,” “guttering” or a “Peterson”, which is kind of fun to know, even though this isn’t a group. A group of woodpeckers is a “descent” which really isn’t as interesting as far as I’m concerned. Thus ended our lesson for today. Thanks for attending. 🙂

Although Lisa was happy and I was happy that she was happy, we didn’t see nearly as many birds as usual overall, but the saguaros didn’t disappoint. Which is just what my husband always says about Chianti. 🙂

Six-Word Saturday 4.2.22

Some things are not improved by words. Welcome to April.

FOTD 4.1.22

“You should expect visitors when you leave the door open.”
― Anthony T. Hincks

If you don’t have hands, traditional doors are difficult to open, so you must leave your door open all the times as in this rustic birdhouse in the Preserve, which is just waiting for visitors.

“Unusual doors often take you to the unusual worlds!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

I first saw insect houses in France but you can find them in the U.S. as well. This one in Tohono Chul made me wonder once again what sort of insects live here and would I want them around my house. I imagine birds might love insect houses but not for the same reason as the insects!

“Doors to beautiful things do not remain open forever. Be fast to enter inside!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

Monday Lisa from Micro of the Macro drove down from Flagstaff to visit the Riparian Preserve with me and just generally hang out, a return trip for the one I took to Flag months ago. We’d only met once and I was afraid I wouldn’t recognize her or she me so I made sure to text her where I was sitting at the coffee shop where we planned to meet. After coffee and talk, we spent a long time enjoy spring at the Preserve. Near one lake, I turned to see this soft, lovely little nest made of found material right at eye level. While it might be true that feathering your own nest is not necessarily considered good for humans, it’s obviously a great idea for birds.

Yes, we did have a great time as well as a delicious and healthy lunch at a new restaurant called Flower Child. Now I’m looking forward to my next trip “up north” to Flag.

Thursday Doors 3.31.22

One Word Sunday: symmetry

Six-Word Saturday 3.5.22

For those of you who know me, the location of my special place in the Big Horn mountains near Sheridan, Wyoming won’t come as a surprise to you. I’ve gone there for some amount of time every summer since I was in college with the exception of two years. I think you can see why from this first photo.

But Wyoming is a three-day drive from our part of Arizona, so I need special places a bit closer. In our backyard is a torch cactus that has the most gorgeous flowers…but for only one day each. They’re a special place close to home.

Macro photography takes me to special places.

I wasn’t the only one who found this datura special.

Thanks, Karina, for hostessing this special episode of the Lens-Artists challenge.