Posts Tagged ‘Thursday doors’

Ethnic doors

Posted: April 27, 2017 in Thursday doors
Tags: , ,

Ahhh, Thursday again, time for one of my favorite blogging show-and-tell times: Thursday Doors. Last week, I drove the two-and-a-half hours to Urbana, Illinois to visit one of my best friends. She and her husband have an a-door-able almost-one-year-old, so it was a lot of fun. While her husband was at work, the three of us took to the road for a bit of fun. At a stoplight, I noticed this Native American door in front of us.  🙂  (I read somewhere that quite a few Native Americans prefer being called “Indians”, although with so many Asian Indians in the US, Native American may be less confusing.)

© janet m. webb 2017

I noticed that a Mexican restaurant next to our bank has closed. This side door caught my attention but I was obviously in too much of a hurry taking the shot from the car window, to focus properly. Still and all, it’s a cool door, so I’m including it anyway.

© janet m. webb 2017

One of the most disconcerting things about vacation is how quickly it seems that you never went. Taking photos helps bring back the vacation experience, so these doors transport me to one of my walks to Old Town Pasadena.  After my first day, I went online to locate somewhere to have tea or one of my periodic coffee drinks.  For the latter, I found Amara Chocolate and Coffee.

Mochas top the short list of coffee drinks I like.  At Amara, there are no mochas (by name), but their cacao latte raises the mocha bar moon-high.  Add 63% dark Venezuelan chocolate to coffee and milk and it’s sheer bliss!  I made a point of stopping there again on my last day.  They’ve officially spoiled me for all other mochas and I was happy to have had the opportunity to tell that to the owner.

With that delicious thought in mind, let’s head for the doors (and you can listen to The Doors as well, if you like.)  To see more of the doors (no caps), you can take a virtual trip around the world through the portal at Norm’s blog.  Be aware that the portal is disguised as a blue froggy-like creature.  Just click on it and the portal will open.  Just hang on to your drink!

© janet m. webb 2017

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No dearth of photograph-worthy doors in the City of Brotherly Love. It’s filled with lovely doors of all sorts.  Today’s trio runs the gamut from intricately designed to simple and colorful to one that’s missing an essential ingredient.

Thursday Doors never misses any ingredients as cooked up a-door-ably by our amiable chef from Montreal, Norm.  Hopefully he’s no longer snowed under, but no matter.  The door to world-wide doors is always open if you click on the blue linky critter on his site.

© janet m. webb 2017

© janet m. webb 2017

© janet m. webb 2017

Once you’re tuned into doors, a walk becomes even more interesting.  On my first walk to Old Town, I was on a mostly commercial street, so opportunities for flowers, one of so-called SoCal’s best features, was limited.  But doors there were aplenty.

Far away from SoCal, snowy Montreal is the home of Norm, our a-door-able host.  Be sure to drop by his blog and, if you want to get a better handle on the door challenge, click on the blue link critter to access the other entries for the week.  Anyone’s welcome to join and our motto could be “So many doors, so little time.”

An hysterical historical landmark.

© janet m. webb 2017

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Although I left for yesterday’s photo challenge, let’s go back to Valley Forge National Park for another day.  Despite being located there and being a national monument to George Washington,  the chapel doesn’t belong to the park, but is a beautiful, active Episcopal parish.

The cornerstone for Milton Medary’s Gothic Revival building was laid in 1903, but construction didn’t begin until 1912.  The exterior was finished five years later, the interior nice.  Wikipedia further tells us:

Noted ironsmith Samuel Yellin produced the wrought iron gates, hardware & locks. He was one of many artisans to produce sculptures, stonework, stained glass and metal work.[6] The interior woodwork was supplied by Belgian-American cabinetmaker Edward Maene (1852–1931).[7]

Although there are beautiful sculptures, furniture, and stained glass windows (food for upcoming posts), today’s focus, as usual on Thursday, is on doors.  Here are a few that grace the chapel.  Be sure open the door to our host Norm’s blog to see what he has on offer today and click on the blue linky critter to see doors from around the world.

© janet m. webb 2017

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Philadelphia is universally known as the City of Brotherly Love.  It’s probably mostly unknown as “City of Homes.” The Philadelphia Encyclopedia says:

Lining Philadelphia’s straight, gridiron streets, the row house defines the vernacular architecture of the city and reflects the ambitions of the people who built and lived there. Row houses were built to fit all levels of taste and budgets, from single-room bandbox plans to grand town houses. The row house was easy to build on narrow lots and affordable to buy, and its pervasiveness resulted in Philadelphia becoming the “City of Homes” by the end of the nineteenth century. As Philadelphia emerged as an industrial epicenter, the row house became synonymous with the city and was held up as an exemplar for egalitarian housing for all.

The oldest residential city street in the US, Elfreth’s Alley  in Philadelphia, is a showplace of 18th century row houses still in use. If you missed my post and Thursday Doors entry about it, just click on the highlighted link (the first one).  Most people in Philadelphia live in a row house.

© janet m. webb 2017

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For yesterday’s Photo Challenge, I revisited Basel, Switzerland.  While waiting for our flight the next day, we were blessed to meet Claudia, a fellow blogger who lives in Basel and was happy to show us around her lovely city for an afternoon.  My favorite part was wandering the streets of the non-tourist areas, seeing the very old, but well-kept buildings and, of course, doors, although this was well before I joined Thursday Doors. Oh, all the doors I missed!  🙂  I’ve featured some of the Basel doors here before, but here are a few more for your enjoyment.

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