Posts Tagged ‘Thursday doors’

Three years ago, I visited our daughter in southern California and one day when she had to work, I spent a marvelous day wandering in Descanso Gardens. What a place! The flowers were in full bloom and I even managed to find a few gates and doors. But only this one had a giant rabbit on the other side! Farmer McGregor, beware!

A somewhat ordinary door, but not every ordinary door is guarded by lions!

Fancier gates with a set of double doors behind them.

There’s a door somewhere in here, even if you have to meditate to find it and be a midget to get inside.

for Thursday Doors 10.22.20

I had occasion not long ago to take my parents to Sedona, Arizona and time to kill while they went about their business. I headed back to the lovely shopping area of Tlaquepaque, where I thought I’d relax and look around. I also ended up finding some Christmas presents and a great pair of earrings for myself, so that worked out well. Of course Tlaquepaque also has some doors and gates worthy of including in a Thursday Doors post, but I had to be careful not to include any I’d used in a previous post.

Simplicity is the key here.

This door was not only interesting to look at, but made for a photo that needs a second look. There’s a bit of reflection, but you can also see straight through the gallery to the courtyard on the other side.

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A few years ago I attended a parade in Naperville. There were some good doors on display and what went with them wasn’t bad either. Which is your favorite?

for Thursday Doors 10.8.20

In our neighborhood, doors tend not to be too exciting, as most of them have screen doors on the outside, often with thicker screens called sun screens rather than bug screens to help keep out…you guessed it. Keeping out the sun factors greatly into your electric bills, especially in summer, which runs from temperature-wise from about May-September.

So I’m being creative in presenting these three doors from our neighborhood. I hope you’ll enjoy them. And welcome to October!

This view is unusual in that there’s standing water in the shot, something you don’t often see here. It’s not from rain but from watering the common area in our HOA (homeowners association.)

This one’s for Dan (and the neighborhood children.) The park’s called “Train Park”, possibly named by Captain Obvious. 🙂

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It’s been a full, good, but very long day. It’s 9:30 pm and I need to go to sleep. So I almost didn’t do a post this week…but decided instead that I’d not exactly cheat but share a photo where there is a door but it’s not the star attraction. This is the visitor center at Saguaro National Park which we visit again two days ago to share it with our older daughter who’s visiting us for the week. The door is just an ordinary door, the park anything but ordinary, the shadows extraordinary.

And now, good night, and a blessed Thursday to each of you.

for Thursday Doors…9.24.20

As many of you know, I or we go to Wyoming every summer. I think I’ve missed two since college. The route has stayed almost the same for all those years and since I moved to Cleveland in the mid-seventies, it’s always been along interstate 80 and 90, simply shortening when we moved to Illinois.

However, once we moved to Arizona, that all changed. Only the last 30 miles are the same, so I had a lot of new territory to discover. My brother and his family have been going this way for many, many years, so my brother suggested I stay in a small motel in Raton, New Mexico.

While Raton has had its day, it seems that day might be in the past. There seem to be lots of empty a/o decaying buildings. Just a fun fact: you might have heard of a group form there called The Fireballs, a rock and roll group, had a number-one hit with 1963’s “Sugar Shack” and number-9 hit with “Bottle of Wine”. At any rate, I found these two marvelous retro buildings with their doors. I think this gas station is wonderful.

The theater or the theatre? Depends where you are. I may find more buildings and doors in the upcoming years but these will have to do for today.

for Thursday Doors 9.17.20

The next door ranch was sold a few years ago and now all the buildings stand empty, our association has the right to ride through. Just remember that a gate that’s closed should be closed after you go through and if it was open, leave it open. The horses tend to be on high alert whenever riding through and if ever a gate blew open or something popped out from behind a building, you’d better hope you’re holding on or you’ll be walking.

This first door is a door for horses or animals, but we don’t discriminate at Thursday Doors! (Don’t want to get sued.)

I could have gotten a better angle on this door but I was on horseback, so I took what I could get.

for Thursday Doors 9.9.20

In much of Wyoming, the doors of choice are outdoors (or maybe sometimes outhouse doors), but if you look, you can sometimes find doors of the more normal sort. Both sets of doors today are definitely not geared towards people tending toward the wide side. But anyone can view them from the outside, the best place to by in Wyoming.

This is the door end of a sheepherder’s wagon. It’s not in use now in that capacity, but it works well for a unique door. Talk about tiny houses before tiny houses were the in thing! And this one is moveable. Click here for a short but very cool, one might even say cold, look at how an entire family lived in one of these! And seriously, you all need to take a look at these incredible Woolywagons. These days you can rent one also instead of a motel room if you so choose. Dan, Norm, or any other handy DIYers want to build your own? Here are “20 Awesome Shepherders Plans” ready and waiting. You could get more than one blog post out of that project!

Drat! I forgot Norm was taking this week and the next two off. Well, I hope you enjoyed the limited edition Thursday Doors. I wonder if anyone else forgot.

Not far from our cabin in Wyoming is Spear-O-Wigwam, listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Begun in 1923 as a dude ranch (a place for people to experience a “civilized” taste of the western lifestyle), it closed in that capacity in 2011, but happily recently reopened under local ownership. And it has a famous door… or at least a door used by a famous writer.

One of its log guest cabins is known as the “Hemingway Cabin”, where Ernest Hemingway stayed in 1928 with his wife Pauline while writing A Farewell to Arms. For a fascinating look at both the ranch’s history and the connection to Hemingway, click here.

But this IS a Thursday Door post, so I suppose you want to see the door…and of course there is one (otherwise how would “Papa” have gotten inside)?

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In basketball, a triple double occurs when a player gets a total of 10 or more in each of three statistical categories (usually points, assists, and rebounds) in one game. Simone Biles completed a triple-twisting double back flip in the floor exercise and a double-double dismount on the balance beam, both of which I can barely imagine, let alone think of doing. However, in this post, I score a triple double double with my Philadelphia doors. I’ll take it. Are those all 10’s I see?

Let’s lead off with the triple. Notice the bench in case you want to just sit and stare at the doors or if Coach Norm benches you for some door infraction. ( Don’t worry, he’s one of those who let’s everyone play.)

Now for a rather unusual double! Someone threw everything but the kitchen sink, and maybe that as well, at this house.

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