Posts Tagged ‘#ThursdayDoors’

On a day when eating figures prominently for those of us in the US, you might cast your mind back to my delicious meal at The Big Texan restaurant. Today however, we’re focusing, literally and figuratively, on some of the doors found there. This pair is bright and cheerful-looking.

This single door’s a bit more elegant. The sign tells us the restaurant was established on Route 66 in 1960, touts the 72 oz. steak challenge (streamed live on their website!!), gives a shout-out to the home-brewed beer (I can attest that it’s good), there’s free wi-fi (but who really needs that when you’re eating?), and that they don’t accept checks.

Finally, we have a vintage police car with a Route 66 door. I think you could get more than a few 72 oz. steaks from that big boy next to the car and that’s no bull! 🙂 (I imagine it would be a steer.)

To those of you celebrating Thanksgiving, I pray you have a wonderful day filled with love and blessings. Of course I pray the same for all the rest of you as well. We all have much for which to be thankful, whether on one specially named day or not. Dan, thanks for hosting Thursday Doors as usual and Norm, thanks for starting it.

We’ve taken our virtual airplane (first class seats and service only, naturally) from Arizona’s Petrified Forest to Redondo Beach, California for round two of this group of tiny doors. No history that I know of, no stories, just some tiny houses with tiny doors. After viewing, feel free to walk across the street, view the ocean, and enjoy the weather. The return flight won’t take off until just after midnight Pacific Standard time, so take time to relax. Tomorrow we’ll finish up at Petrified Forest and then see where our journey takes us next.

Thursday Doors 10.20.22

We’re not leaving Petrified Forest just because it’s time for Thursday Doors. I found a few doors in the park despite most of the attractions being outdoor. Lots of doors open to the outside, but there are some very attractive ones inside as well as you can see from this cabinet door in the Painted Desert Inn.

This door, from the same place, is more functional but still attractive in its own way.

This of course is the inside of a door that opened to the outside at one time, the door to the 1932 Studebaker I talked about in yesterday’s post. I would imagine that if you saw the inside of a door on any of today’s models, they’d look quite different. But they might not hold up as well against the ravages of time in the desert.

As promised, tomorrow we’ll visit Puerco Pueblo. See you then.

Thanks to Dan for hosting Thursday Doors, taking over ably after creator Norm stepped aside. Thursdays just wouldn’t be the same without TD!

Yes, California tiny doors are back. These houses have an ocean view but even though that raises the price, they might be the only affordable homes around! I didn’t see any “For Sale” signs though, so you’ll have to keep waiting if you plan to move into the area.

I see I missed most of a teapot house on the far left side. May have to check that one out next time I’m there.

I prefer my fans indoors but last time we were there, it was hot and humid enough that one this size outdoors might have helped as few people near the beach have AC.

Thursday Doors 10.6.22

Here comes Thursday again and that means it’s time for Thursday Doors. Hurrah! A few days ago I met Donna from Wind Kisses at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix. I did a very brave thing–I didn’t take my camera along, only my phone, and vowed not to stop constantly to take photos, just enjoy the time with a friend. It went better than I expected although I admit to taking a few shots with my phone. But we not only saw the beauty of the desert but had an tasty lunch and lots of good friend time.

The three insect houses have sections that look like doors although every opening actually is a door when it’s in an insect house. I had to include this quote because it made me laugh and can be so true:

“Insect life was so loud that when you parked the car and got out it sounded as if you had suddenly tuned into a radio frequency from another planet.”
― David Samuels

“We don’t give a damn to the insects on our Earth, but if we could find even a single insect on Mars, the whole world would cherish it like crazy!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

“If it were illegal to kill insects, I’d be in the clink for three million years.”
― Foster Kinn, Freedom’s Rush II: More Tales from the Biker and the Beast

“Every being devotes and dedicates itself to some innate purpose. Single cells, microbes, plants, insects, animals—every being makes its own unique contribution.”
― Julie J. Morley, Future Sacred: The Connected Creativity of Nature

Although not much in the way of flowers or plants was blooming during our visit to Descanso Gardens, we were able for the first time to visit Boddy House, named for the original owner and something was definitely blooming inside.

Perched high above the Descanso Gardens landscape on the crest of a hill, the historic Boddy House offers a glimpse of a glamorous bygone era. Built as the home of Descanso founder E. Manchester Boddy in the late 1930s, the Boddy House today is a must for every first-time visitor. (from the Descanso website)

I’m sure Elias Manchester Boddy wouldn’t have recognized the exhibit inside the house itself, standing in stark contrast to the simple elegance of the house itself. Your (Un)natural Garden has creations throughout the park but the house is the epicenter.

Artist Adam Schwerner asks visitors to please touch the art. Opening April 16, Your (Un)natural Garden is an experience like nothing at Descanso before.

Installations at the Sturt Haaga Gallery, Boddy House, and throughout the landscape will intrigue visitors’ senses and invite participation. Archways, created with found materials, will lead to the art gallery and house. Once there, explore rooms that will surprise you – from hundreds of bells playing to feather boas hanging from the ceiling. (from the website)

We’ll take closer looks at the installation but as it’s Thursday, we’ll focus on the doors. The front door is not usually this vibrant pink but it foreshadows what you’ll find inside. I decided to take the shot from a different angle than the usual and just a warning: you might want to don your sunglasses as we go inside.

You might be pardoned for not immediately homing in on the door in this shot if you were at the house. It seems even more simple when contrasted with the wallpaper and the exhibit on the other side. But the outlining of the one panel raises it beyond the usual.

Finally we see the somewhat more subdued back door leading to the patio with its share of the creations. It was fun to be able to see the inside of the house, although I’d like to go back when it’s restored to its non-(un)natural garden state as well.

It’s Thursday again and thus time for Thursday Doors, one of the best challenges out there. We’re still in Hermosa Beach, California living the beach and grandson life for a few more days so here are a few of the more unique doors I’ve seen on my walks. Sorry I couldn’t avoid reflections in the first one but I think it stands on its own (so to speak) anyway.

Tough to beat an old-fashioned mail box.

I drive a van, but it certainly doesn’t have a door like this one. But then I don’t live where there’s any surfing, either.

Most of all, happy 38th anniversary to my a-door-able husband. Thanks for putting up with me for so many years and you’d best be prepared to put up with me for many more! ❤

I’ve been walking along the beach in the mornings on The Strand, officially the Marvin Braude Bike Trail, a paved, 22-mile (35-km) path running from Will Rogers State Beach in the north to Torrance County Beach in the south. There are houses of all sorts, from enormous to small (all some degree of expensive), houses that would look perfect in New England while others wouldn’t be out of place in Europe, modern to houses that might have been in Italy for many years, and of course all these houses have doors. The problem for me is that there are quite a few people out and about in the early morning and it feels a bit awkward to me sometimes to be taking photos of doors when I’m not that far away from the house itself and the homeowners might be looking out as they sip their morning coffee.

Nevertheless, I’ve managed to capture a few doors and today I’ve chosen some wooden ones that look quite substantial. Don’t try to kick these doors down the way they often do on TV! The only thing likely to break would be your leg.

Thursday Doors 9.8.22

California is the perfect place to find beautiful old cars as there’s no salt on the roads in what passes for winter in most parts of the state. I’ve seen more than these three beauties in the few days we’ve been here but these are the only ones I was able to capture on camera. Which one would you like to own? Don’t worry about what appear to be low tires in the third photo. There’s a median there, cutting off the bottom of the tires in the photo.

As always, Thursday Doors is hosted by Dan at No Facilities. Besides being our host, he’s now published two books that are getting great reviews. You can check them out on his site, see the doors he’s featuring this week, and click on links to see doors all over the world just by going here. You’re also welcome to participate by sharing a door or two if you so desire.

Deborah and I explored the first floor of the historic Sheridan Inn on our day in town, Thursday, the horses’ day off, although I don’t think they (the horses) participate in Thursday Doors. They’re too busy enjoying having no riders, grazing, and sometimes just horsing around. Yup, I couldn’t pass that one up. The upstairs of the inn where the guest rooms are is off limits but there’s plenty to see downstairs and of course more than a few doors to share for this Thursday Doors edition.

According to Historic Hotels of America:

The historic Sheridan Inn, designated a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, is located in Sheridan, Wyoming, and is steeped in Western tradition. Designed by Thomas Kimball to resemble a Scottish hunting lodge and built in 1893 by the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad on behalf of the Inn’s first operator, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, who auditioned new talent for his “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West” company from the front porch. Following a 50-year vacancy and extensive $7 million renovation, the Sheridan Inn once again opened its doors to welcome visitors in May 2015. Today, guests are able to step back in time and experience the bygone days of the Wild West while enjoying modern comforts.

Here’s a closer look at the front doors. I would deem them attractively useful.

In the parlor, the sideboard doors sport attractive design, while venturing around the far end of the table…

…reveals a screen that a diehard door-woman might consider a door to the fireplace. You get that, right? That’s all for today, but I’m sure there will be another visit or two, whether for doors or just to enjoy the grandeur of the hotel, who knows? Happy Doorsday, all! Thanks to Dan for opening the door almost every week of the year to doors of various sorts from around the world.