Posts Tagged ‘travel’

“Against the Odds” is the theme for this week’s challenge and I think you’re unlikely to find a crossing sign like this very often.  Yes, all of these were present in the area where the narrow French road twisted through a small farm. Looks a bit like a fairy tale illustration to me or a child-as-Pied-Piper sign.

© janet m. webb 2014

 

I’ve featured doors from Villersexel before on Thursday Doors, as well as the chateau that distinguishes this town of under 2,000 residents.  In 1871, the French and the Prussians battled here, during which time the mostly-timber chateau was destroyed by fire.  In the same year, the owner looked for an architect working with more fire-resistant materials, choosing the young Gustave Eiffel (yes, that Eiffel) who was working with iron.  Shall I say that Eiffel developed into a towering talent?  Perhaps not.

At any rate, the chateau is completely furnished in this period. Lafayette reportedly lived in the current Chateau, while Charles De Gaulle and Winston Churchill both stayed there.  However, most of the people live in less exalted homes, yet homes with interesting doors.  These three represent three different sorts of doors, something for everyone.

The colorfully elegant…

© janet m. webb 2016

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I decided to go with an arches theme this week, but not the golden arches of McDo (long o sound) as it’s sometimes called in Europe.  These doors are from Colmar, the city I’ve featured before, that has vacillated between being part of French and part of Germany, but while always keeping not only a colorful past but colorful buildings and doors.  I also had a bit of fun playing with editing on the framing.  Welcome to December!  For more of this week’s Thursday Doors entries, click here.

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

 

 

There are a number of thermal baths in Plombieres-les-bains, France, with various elegant décors.  This one caught our eyes, though, because of the wonderful Art Deco interior.  We weren’t able to sample the various therapeutic delights available, but we did try the waters.  I mentioned in an earlier post that one type of water was to be taken if you have constipation, the other for diarrhea.   We made sure to try a little of each, just to keep things under control.  🙂  As for the thermal baths themselves, massages, and other choices, hopefully next time.

© janet m. webb 2016

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(Little) Venice

Posted: October 15, 2016 in Travel
Tags: , , , ,

Colmar, France is noted for being picturesque and a part of that comes from the narrow boats plying their way up and down the section of the river Lauch that cuts through the colorful, half-timbered houses and businesses. After lunch under the awnings in the restaurant on the right, we, like so many others, took photos from the Saint-Pierre Bridge. We did not, however, take a boat ride.  All our exploration was done on foot.

© janet m. webb 2016 (more…)

Today let’s head back to the Alsace part of France, to Colmar in particular.  Half-timbered buildings and marvelous colors are what the old part of the city is known for and there are blocks and blocks of these beauties.  From this distance, you can’t see the door as well, but you can enjoy the colors.

Norm hosts Thursday Doors, one of the most enjoyable challenges out there.  Stop by or join in.

© janet m. webb 2016 (more…)

We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.
~John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra

I’m by nature and nurture an optimist, despite much evidence to the contrary, an optimist who loves to travel to all sorts of places: lake, ocean, desert.  But when I’m in the mountains, it’s as if I were a jigsaw puzzle missing one small piece; a picture complete as is, but reaching its full beauty when that one piece is in place.

I don’t go to France for mountains.  My s-i-l and b-i-l live in the ancient forest of the Vosges, hilly and peaceful (except during hunting season.)  On this trip, however, during one of our patented driving trips of exploration, we ended in the Haute (High) Vosges.  The road twisted, turned, and climbed and with each turn, my spirits rose and my heart and soul filled.

If you’ve visited Germany’s Black Forest, you know the Haute Vosges.

There is great similarity between the Vosges and the corresponding range of the Black Forest on the other side of the Rhine: both lie within the same degrees of latitude, have similar geological formations and are characterized by forests on their lower slopes, above which are open pastures and rounded summits of a rather uniform altitude; furthermore, both exhibit steeper slopes towards the Rhine and a more gradual descent on the other side.
~Wikipedia

Here are some of the views above the village of Kruth that kindled my enthusiasm, made my nerves quiver, and filled every pore and cell.

© janet m. webb 2016

Enormous woodpiles for winter heat are everywhere. These are some of the smaller stacks we saw.

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn.”
~John Muir, The Mountains of California

© janet m. webb 2016

Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity.
~John Muir, Our National Parks

© janet m. webb 2016

I am losing precious days. I am degenerating into a machine for making money. I am learning nothing in this trivial world of men. I must break away and get out into the mountains to learn the news.
~John Muir

© janet m. webb 20016