Posts Tagged ‘unique doors’

While archive diving for this week, I realized I didn’t really get too many door photos during my last (2019) visit to France. But I did find at least a couple that aren’t the usual run-of-the-mill doors. This first one, while not a great photo, is a door to something you probably haven’t seen: a walk-up egg automat. You can see the egg cartons filled with organic eggs and on the left a list of prices, 2-3 Euros, and a description of the eggs. Put in your money and take your eggs. No refrigeration either.

© janet m. webb

The unique thing about this door as well as the shutters is that there’s nothing behind any of them, like a movie set on the second and third floors. However in Europe, that would be the first and second floor, the floors above the ground floor.

© janet m. webb

The yellow door on the left leads to a property à vendre, for sale. The door on the right? Apparently beer at least is involved. The Licence IV sign you see on the wall on the right is the French permit allowing cafes, brasseries, (French restaurants selling simple food), and restaurants to serve alcohol. The official signs are bolted to the walls of the establishments.

© janet m. webb

Ok, we’ve got eggs and alcohol. Maybe an omelet and a glass of wine? I imagine there’s a pâtisserie nearby where we can get dessert. Gotta go! Are you coming?

for Thursday Doors 1.28.21

In our neighborhood, doors tend not to be too exciting, as most of them have screen doors on the outside, often with thicker screens called sun screens rather than bug screens to help keep out…you guessed it. Keeping out the sun factors greatly into your electric bills, especially in summer, which runs from temperature-wise from about May-September.

So I’m being creative in presenting these three doors from our neighborhood. I hope you’ll enjoy them. And welcome to October!

This view is unusual in that there’s standing water in the shot, something you don’t often see here. It’s not from rain but from watering the common area in our HOA (homeowners association.)

This one’s for Dan (and the neighborhood children.) The park’s called “Train Park”, possibly named by Captain Obvious. 🙂

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In much of Wyoming, the doors of choice are outdoors (or maybe sometimes outhouse doors), but if you look, you can sometimes find doors of the more normal sort. Both sets of doors today are definitely not geared towards people tending toward the wide side. But anyone can view them from the outside, the best place to by in Wyoming.

This is the door end of a sheepherder’s wagon. It’s not in use now in that capacity, but it works well for a unique door. Talk about tiny houses before tiny houses were the in thing! And this one is moveable. Click here for a short but very cool, one might even say cold, look at how an entire family lived in one of these! And seriously, you all need to take a look at these incredible Woolywagons. These days you can rent one also instead of a motel room if you so choose. Dan, Norm, or any other handy DIYers want to build your own? Here are “20 Awesome Shepherders Plans” ready and waiting. You could get more than one blog post out of that project!

Drat! I forgot Norm was taking this week and the next two off. Well, I hope you enjoyed the limited edition Thursday Doors. I wonder if anyone else forgot.

Only one shot this week because what else could go with this??

Welcome back, Norm. I hope you had a wonderful two weeks off, but door-n it, we missed you!

Seen on the bathroom wall at Carr Valley Cheese, Mauston, Wisconsin

Not only do most people not have doors like this, not everyone has a door guardian like the one belonging to this Basel family.  Perhaps the bush in front of him used to be as large as the one on the opposite side and he’s been munching it down for lo, these many years.  Who knows?

Want to join Thursday Doors?  Click on the link, which will connect you to Norm’s site, and follow the directions.  It’s lots of fun and you’ll see all sorts of interesting, beautiful, unique, and sometimes weird, doors.

Basel doors #2 copyright janet m. webb 2014