Posts Tagged ‘US history’

You say you’ve heard that before?  ‘Tis true.  I cannot tell a lie.  (You say you’ve heard that before as well?) You did know he had to sleep somewhere, right?  A number of somewheres!  Well, this is one of the somewheres!

During the time the Continental Army bivouacked at Valley Forge, most of the men slept in wooden huts that they’d made laboriously by hand (and axe.)  I always had the impression that they nearly froze in tents, but during our recent trip to Valley Forge, I found out that wasn’t true, at least the tent part.  Many of them probably felt as though they were freezing, dressed inadequately and without, in many cases, proper shoes or boots, and for much too long, food supplies were inadequate.

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I’m moving up a few centuries or more and over a continent this week to feature part one of a post I’ve been promising Dan at NoFacilities for some time.  He told me that when I was in Philadelphia, I should stop by Elfreth’s Alley and I’d find not only history, but lots of doors for Thursday Doors.  Well, Dan, I made it and you were right! Here’s a bit of what I found.

The Alley in old City of Philadelphia is the oldest residential street in the US, but was originally set up as alternative route to the river when the city was becoming overcrowded. Two landowners combined their properties in 1706 to open the cart path named for silversmith Jeremiah Elfreth. As with so many other historic locations, the work of a diverse group of people saved and restored the Alley and, in the 1960’s, obtained National Historic Landmark status, preserving the Alley for all of us.

Between now and Wednesday, I’ll be mostly offline, so have a wonderful weekend and I’ll see you then (or maybe before, depending upon my time.)

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016

© janet m. webb 2016