Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Sedona, Arizona is known for many things, including a variety of outdoor activities and its art community. But the first things that come to mind (and to the eyes) are its iconic red rocks and you can’t miss them. Here are a few formations we saw on our visit there a week and a half ago. No need to lace up your hiking boots, wear a mask, or social distance. Just sit back and enjoy the view.

Bell Rock just north of The Village of Oak Creek

A view with its own weathered wood frame

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Fuzzy Friday

Posted: June 26, 2020 in Nature
Tags: , , , , ,

No, I’m not referring to my state of mind (although you may beg to differ) but to the sun highlighting some fuzzy beauties. My brother and I used to call plants like these “tippy toes.” Not sure why, but I still love the name.

The Riparian Preserve seems to have gone to the birds and it’s true, there are all sorts of birds and lots of them. Birders are there daily, some with camera lenses as big as my leg and almost as long. To them my telephoto lens must look like a macro lens.

But it’s not just about the birds or even about the animals (most abundant of which are the rabbits.) There are plants, too, and the palo verde, native to the Sonoran desert where we are, is one of my favorites. I love the bright yellow and the feathery look.

Palo verde means “green stick” in Spanish and once you get closer, you can see why.

The trees can photosynthesize through their green bark, an important adaptation for a tree that drops its leaves during the warm season and in response to fall cooling. Palo verdes also drop stems and branches to combat drought. ~Desert USA

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Have you seen the signs by new apartments that say “If you lived here, you’d be home by now?” I thought of that when I saw this hole, which quite likely could be home to a bird of some sort.

If you lived here, you’d be next door to an outstanding restaurant.

If you lived here, you’d have a cozy little place just right for you.

If you lived here, you’d have a fantastic bird’s eye view. It ups the price, but you’ll appreciate the space and amenities. King-sized bed included.

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for Six Word Saturday

It’s been an odd week. Monday I posted a photo (late, due to some weird WP stuff) that I thought was rather good. If I’m to be truthful, I thought it would wow people. It got some great comments, but not many “likes” at all. Yesterday I posted a video I felt the same about. It did a bit better, but not what I expected either. Topsy-turvy. So today I’m playing. Who knows what will happen? No matter what, have a wonder-filled Wednesday!

Topsy turvy black-necked stilts

This is the action video that goes with the bee shot I shared some time ago. Please spend the minute and two seconds to watch the entire video so you see why it’s a two-fer.

I know it’s rude to watch someone while they’re eating, and even worse, take photos, but sometimes I just can’t help myself. I caught this snowy egret mid-gulp and nope, I don’t feel bad about it at all.

Snowy egret or great egret? Egret or heron? If you’re not sure which egret is which, as I wasn’t, the site linked above lets you compare types side-by-side, which is really helpful. The snowy egret has a dark beak with yellow at the top and by the eyes as well as yellow feet, which you can’t see here. The great egret has a yellow-orange bill and is much larger. But I didn’t know that egrets are also herons. Did you?

And did you know snowy egrets were once more precious than gold? The allaboutbirds site says:

During the breeding season, adult Snowy Egrets develop long, wispy feathers on their backs, necks, and heads. In 1886 these plumes were valued at $32 per ounce, which was twice the price of gold at the time. Plume-hunting for the fashion industry killed many Snowy Egrets and other birds until reforms were passed in the early twentieth century. The recovery of shorebird populations through the work of concerned citizens was an early triumph and helped give birth to the conservation movement.

Talk about killer fashion! Makes me even happier to see crowds of these fashion leaders now at the Riparian Preserve!